Web Content Viewer

Health & Wellness Library

Articles, videos and more to keep your family healthy.

Health & Wellness Library All Articles

We are displaying of articles


  • Article

    10 Ways to keep your child's heart healthy

    Take charge of your child’s heart health by developing habits now that will reap benefits later in life. According to Dr. Colin Kane, pediatric cardiologist at Children’s Health℠, the most effective way to do this is to make healthy living a priority for the whole family.


  • Article

    3 Cool rules for being safe in the pool

    A swimming pool is a great place for kids to cool off. It's also a great place for kids to get into trouble when no one's looking. How well does your child swim? Pool safety starts before your child ever gets into the water and understanding your child’s skill level can help you make smart decisions about water safety. You can learn more about your child’s swimming ability by going to your local YMCA to receive a FREE swim assessment. If your child is not a strong swimmer, enroll him or her in swim classes. The YMCA offers swimming classes for children six months and up. Even children that pass a swim assessment can benefit from additional swim instruction. Learning the rules of the water and how to be a strong swimmer is a great defense against drowning.


  • Article

    4 Back to school tips that may surprise you

    The start of a new school year can be exciting, but it can also make your child feel anxious, especially if last year was a rough one, or if he or she is entering a new school. There are a lot of great back-to-school tips online (e.g., get on a good sleep schedule before school starts, get organized the day before, eat a good breakfast, know your class schedule and syllabus). So instead of rehashing what’s already out there, here are 4 back to school tips.


  • Article

    5 Tips for preventing hot car deaths

    We all know that the Texas summer heat is serious business. But did you know that Texas leads the nation in hot car deaths? Each year an average of 10 children in Texas die from being left a hot car. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, on a relatively mild 80-degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise 19 degrees in just 10 minutes. And because a child's body heats up three to five times faster than an adult's, the risk of heat stroke, brain damage and death is much greater for children left in hot cars.



  • Article

    5 tips for an active, healthier winter

    As the winter months’ approach and the temperatures get cooler, many of us hibernate and seek out our favorite comfort foods. Making time for physical activity not only helps you offset all the holiday eating, but it can also help you create new family traditions around healthier behaviors. Following these five tips from the experts at our Get Up & Go program can help you get on the road to a healthier winter.


  • Article

    6 Questions to ask when looking for a Primary Care Pediatrician

    Choosing a primary care pediatrician to care for your child may be one of the most important decisions you'll make as a parent. "There are a lot of factors to consider when choosing a physician," says Ray Tsai,.D., president of MyChildren's Pediatric Practice. "A good place to start is to ask for referrals from friends and neighbors. You'll also want to look for a practice that's convenient to your home, has convenient hours and takes your insurance. Before you make a final decision, set up an appointment to see how the practice runs and what type of rapport you have with the physician and office staff."


  • Article

    6 Signs your child may have an Eating Disorder

    Eating disorders are characterized by unhealthy approaches to eating, weight and exercise. But they are more than a refusal to eat healthy; eating disorders are complex psychiatric disorders. If your child has an eating disorder, he or she also might have problems with self-image, anxiety and even depression. As many as 30 million people in the United States have an eating disorder. The causes of eating disorders continue to be researched. Biological, sociological, psychological and cultural factors can all play a part in the development of an eating disorder.



  • Article

    7 Common Asthma questions parents ask

    If you worry that your child might have asthma, or your child has recently been diagnosed, you probably have plenty of questions for the doctor. To make the most of your visit with the pediatrician, make a list of those questions and bring them with you. Here are seven questions you'll definitely want on the list:


  • Article

    7 tips for buying safe toys this holiday season

    Toys can be hazardous, resulting in hundreds of thousands of injuries each year for children age 14 or younger. As holiday time approaches, make informed decisions about toy purchases by keeping our tips in mind.


  • Article

    8 Facts about food allergies in children

    Allergies are one of the most common health conditions affecting children (age 0-17). Food allergies currently affect 4 - 6% of our youth in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the number of children diagnosed with food allergies is steadily increasing – up 18% in the past decade.


  • Article

    8 Tips for preventing allergies this spring

    Hay fever is far and away the most common allergy in the United States. Depending on the type of pollen your child is allergic to, he or she may only have symptoms at certain times of year. For instance, a child with a birch pollen allergy will have increased symptoms in the spring when birch trees are in bloom. Kids with grass allergies will be hit hardest during the summer, while those with ragweed allergies will suffer most in the fall.


  • Article

    The big move: 8 ways to help your child adjust to a new school

    Some anxiety should be expected as the new school year gets underway. Every child is different and will handle change in his or her own unique way. Here are a few tips to help your child cope with a significant change in their school environment.


  • Article

    A safe home: poison prevention

    Poison is anything that children can swallow, inhale, touch or get in their eyes that can cause illness or death. Even products that are safe in small doses can be poisonous to a child who consumes too much. Because almost 90% of childhood poisonings happen in the home, it's important for parents to know where the dangers are. At Children’s Health℠, we are committed to your child’s safety. Our Injury Prevention Specialists are available to help keep any potentially dangerous items in your home away from your child—and keep your child out of the hospital.


  • Article

    A brave young girl beats the odds and gives back

    When Brentlee, age 5, was born, all signs pointed to a happy and healthy baby. Her mother Amber carried her to full-term, her delivery went smoothly and she scored great on the Apgar assessment often performed on babies at birth. It wasn’t until she began having difficulties feeding that her mom first suspected something may be amiss.


  • Video

    A childhood connection leads to a heartfelt career

    Erin Hunter, RN, BSN, underwent her first open heart surgery to repair a congenital heart defect known as Tetralogy of Fallot, or TOF for short, when she was just nine months old. She was referred to Children's Medical Center by her physician after her mom noticed she lacked the energy of a typical infant, especially during feedings, and her fingers and lips occasionally turned blue. She would go on to have six additional open heart surgeries by the time she was 11 years old.


  • Article

    A connection that rekindled the dream

    When Tina Myers received a call from her son's gymnastics coach in September 2015, it was unsettling news – her son, Phillip, who was 13 years old at the time, had been injured at practice. He had landed awkwardly on his ankle, and something wasn't right. It would be frightening news for any parent, but for the mom of an elite athlete it was especially alarming. Mrs. Myers immediately picked up Phillip and raced him to the ER at Children’s Medical Center Plano.


  • Article

    A deeper dive into pool safety rules

    We’ve already shared the three essential rules to pool safety. Now let’s dive deep into some more helpful water safety tips to keep your pool safe all year around.



  • Article

    A medical mystery: How children get cancer

    A cancer diagnosis in a child is frightening. Parents may have dozens of questions about their child's health, treatment, and future, including – how did my child get cancer?





  • Article

    A tiny patient puts up a strong fight

    Andrea, now four months old, was born 3 months before her due date. Until her delivery by emergency cesarean section, her mother, Brenda, had had a relatively uneventful pregnancy. As soon as she was born it was discovered that she had a giant sacrococcygeal teratoma at the base of Andrea's tailbone. Dr. Luc Brion, a neonatologist at Children's Health and Professor of Pediatrics at UT Southwestern, and the specialized Resuscitation Team at the Parkland Labor and Delivery Unit provided lifesaving resuscitation for Andrea and helped to stabilize her immediately after delivery. She was then transferred to the Children's Medical Center Dallas Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), the only NICU in North Texas to be designated as a Level IV (the highest level of neonatal care) by the Texas Department of State Health Services and nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report on its "Best Children’s Hospitals" list.


  • Article

    A world of difference

    Juan Carreon is a playful toddler who loves the outdoors and all kinds of food, especially fruit and spaghetti. But feeding him has not always been easy for his mom, Claudia.


  • Article

    A young GERD patient gets answers after 10 years

    For the past 10 years, Gentiana Abagail and her family have searched for answers to chronic gastroenterological issues she has dealt with since birth. As an infant, Gentiana suffered from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Since then, she has seen a number of pediatricians, and her symptoms included difficulty swallowing, an itchy throat, abdominal pain and poor appetite. Each time, her doctors prescribed medications to help relieve the symptoms, but the issues never really went away.


  • Article

    A young man's brave fight against cancer ensures many happy holidays to come

    In 2012, Riley and his family were sitting around the table playing Bingo during the Thanksgiving holiday when he sat up straight in his chair looking completely gray. He had a stomach ache the night before so his parents took him to the emergency room at Children’s Medical Center Dallas right away.



  • Article

    A patient's artwork inspires others to keep fighting

    AJ had been feeling bad for some time when he found himself at Children’s Health. He had been to several other doctors previously, but no one could figure out what was wrong with him, and he and his family were both frustrated and worried.


  • Article

    Adult vs. pediatric hospital: What’s the difference?

    While both adult and pediatric emergency departments have the goal of saving each patient's life and healing their ailments, pediatric departments are more specialized in treating children. In fact, each physician at Children's Health is specially trained in treating young patients. Children are all we care for here, and it allows us to deliver the best care for your child.



  • Article

    After her successful scoliosis surgery, this teen is back on the ice

    Ice skating has always come naturally for 16-year-old Alexa Hassell. She competes regularly and is a coach for younger skaters. When a fall through a trampoline in 2016 resulted in the discovery of scoliosis, Alexa worried about getting back to her favorite pastime.



  • Article

    Are you prepared to help your child cope with anxiety?

    Anxiety disorders affect one in eight children and, if they go unrecognized and untreated, can lead to poor school performance or socialization, loss of sleep and even eventual substance abuse. While anxiety is a normal emotional response to stress, anxiety disorders are psychiatric illnesses characterized by constant and overwhelming worry or fear. Anxiety types and their symptoms can include.


  • Article

    Asthma Educational Resources

    The Asthma Management Program at Children’s Health℠ Children's Medical Center is an outpatient educational program that focuses on asthma education and self-management skills. With that goal in mind, our pediatric asthma experts have put together the following list of educational resources for patients and their families:


  • Article

    Back-to-School anxiety: Ways to help your child cope

    A new school year can trigger feelings of anxiety in children of all ages. There are new classes, teachers, friends and pressures -- all mixed with the physical changes that come with growing up. As a parent, you are the first responder in your child’s life when they are feeling anxious.


  • Article

    Back-to-School nutrition tips

    With kids returning to school, we thought it would be a perfect time to ask Kara Gann, a Clinical Dietitian at Children's Health, for some back-to-school nutrition tips. Eating breakfast is the best way to start the day, for children and adults alike. To encourage your kids to fuel up before school, sit down and eat with them. The act of eating breakfast together models that breakfast is important. If a rushed morning routine keeps you from sitting down for breakfast, set aside 10 to 15 extra minutes to eat. Wake up just a little bit earlier if needed.


  • Article

    Backyard trampolines are not safe for children

    Although jumping, bouncing and somersaulting on trampolines may be fun for kids, it’s not worth the risk. About 100,000 children, in the U.S., are injured on trampolines every year, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.


  • Article

    Springtime Recipe: Beanie Burgers

    We asked the dietitians from our Get Up & Go team to offer up healthy, delicious recipes that fit the spring season. These beanie burgers are light, tasty and a great alternative to the fast food options that many families choose.



  • Article

    Bronchitis in children: Home remedies for kids

    With cold and flu season underway, it's possible your child could come down with a case of bronchitis. And while the symptoms sometimes sound awful - wheezing and a deep, nagging cough that produces mucus - bronchitis in children is typically a mild condition. Home remedies for bronchitis in children can be very effective.


  • Article

    Bullying at school: Helping your child deal this fall

    We asked Melissa Faith, Ph.D., ABPP, and Celia Heppner, Psy.D., Children’s Health℠ pediatric psychologists, for some helpful insights, what signs to look for and how a concerned parent can help their child cope with the issue of bullying. According to stopbullying.gov, bullying is defined as unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. An estimated 75% of children are bullied at least once during their school career, and 10-20% of children are bullied repeatedly over a much longer period of time. Children who are bullied repeatedly over a long period of time are at most risk of problems with behavior, mood, school performance and family or social relationships.


  • Article

    Just the Facts: Busting 6 Asthma Myths

    The spring and summer seasons bring on higher pollen counts, more humidity and changes in air quality, which means it's asthma season. Our knowledge of this condition is constantly improving, but plenty of myths have stuck around. Let's set the record straight about your child's asthma.


  • Article

    Caffeine for kids: safe with limited intake but not recommended

    "Caffeine is generally recognized as safe by the FDA, but caffeine is not recommended for children," says Children's Health registered dietitian, Denon Stacy. "The U.S. doesn't have official guidelines for caffeine intake in children, but a safe threshold according to a recent edition of the Journal of Food and Chemical Toxicology is < or = 2.5 mg caffeine/kilogram/day remains an acceptable limitation."



  • Article

    Caring for depression in children with chronic disease

    A chronic disease diagnosis is difficult to accept at any age. When your child receives a diagnosis of a condition that will have lasting impacts on their life, they may have a strong emotional reaction or become depressed. The changes to their quality of life, such as chronic pain, frequent medical tests or care, or other lifestyle changes, can make them feel anxious, stressed and saddened.



  • Article

    Springtime Recipe: Chicken Lettuce Wraps

    We asked the dietitians from our Get Up & Go team to offer up healthy, delicious recipes that fit the spring season. These lettuce wraps are flavorful, easy to make and a lighter alternative as the weather begins to warm up this season.


  • Infographic

    Childhood Cancer [Infographic]

    The Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Medical Center Dallas is a world-class pediatric treatment center recognized nationally for exceptional clinical care, leadership in pediatric cancer research and academic excellence. All pediatric hematology/oncology physicians are faculty members at UT Southwestern Medical Center.



  • Video

    Children's Health on Good Morning Texas: Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Stormi Pulver White, Psy. D., a pediatric psychologist with the Children's Health Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities joined Dr. Sue Hubbard on WFAA's Good Morning Texas recently to discuss Autism Spectrum Disorder, its signs, symptoms and what you as a parent should know.


  • Video

    Children’s Health Level I Trauma Center

    When 11-year-old Hanna was injured by a vehicle that slipped out of gear, she received the first of many blood transfusions while in flight to Children's Medical Center Dallas, the only Level I Trauma Center in North Texas. Hanna stayed in our trauma ICU for almost 40 days.


  • Article

    Codeine and your child

    With cough and cold season underway, you need to be aware that a time-honored, go-to treatment for children’s coughs is no longer recommended. The FDA is investigating the safety of codeine cough syrup for children younger than 18, and the American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends against codeine for children with coughs.



  • Article

    Separating Allergy Facts from Fiction

    If your child has seasonal or year-round environmental allergies, you already know many of the basic facts. You know your child’s symptoms are triggered by allergens like pollen, dander, or mold spores. You’re aware that these symptoms can make outdoor sports and other activities difficult, if not impossible, for your child during certain months. And, you know your doctor can prescribe certain treatments to ease the sneezing, itching, and watery eyes that appear each year.


  • Article

    Common Sports Injuries: What is a Hip Pointer?

    If you have an athlete in your family, you are probably painfully aware that sports injuries do occur. One injury that is common among athletes is called a 'hip pointer". While you may be picturing a cool, new dance move, a "hip pointer" is actually an injury that occurs from a blunt impact on the point of the hip called the "iliac crest". This type of injury is common among football players but can occur in players of all sports.




  • Article

    An innovative, advanced therapy gives hope to a young cancer patient

    When Conner began complaining about back and leg pain last summer, his parents took him to his pediatrician in Tyler, Texas, to try to determine what was wrong. After his blood work came back normal, he was referred to his local hospital for an MRI and x-ray. The MRI revealed spots indicative of leukemia, and Conner was immediately referred to Children’s Health for further testing and evaluation. Shortly after, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma and was admitted to the Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Health to begin treatment.


  • Article

    Contact lens care for kids

    Serena Wang, M.D., Pediatric Ophthalmologist at Children’s Health and Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at UT Southwestern, warns that an untreated contact lens-related infection can cause adolescents to lose their sight – or even the eye itself. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help your child be a healthier contact lens wearer.



  • Article

    How does living in the Dallas area affect my child's seasonal allergies?

    Every year the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America ranks the worst cities for allergies. In spring 2015, Dallas was the 19th worst. In spring 2016, it fell to 27th — better, but still one of the worst in the nation. Texas is deep in the Pollen Belt — the region of the country that stretches from the southern Midwest to the Southeast. It’s the worst area for allergies in the nation. If your child has seasonal allergies, they have some specific challenges living in the Dallas area. Unlike some other parts of the country, there’s a seasonal allergy for all four seasons:.


  • Article

    Dehydration can sneak up on athletes

    The calendar may say it’s time for fall sports, but the weather is still hot. All those sprints, laps and drills in the sun can take their toll, so before your young athlete heads out for sports practice, remind them to stay hydrated.


  • Article

    Don't let Scoliosis throw your kid a curve

    If you grew up being reminded to stand up straight or pull back your shoulders, you’re not alone. But for three out of every 100 adolescents who are diagnosed with scoliosis, perfect posture [Link to Posture article] might be out of reach without medical intervention.


  • Article

    Ear Infections — Educational Resources

    An ear infection is the number one reason parents bring a child to the doctor. While rare in adults, 75% of kids will develop an ear infection by the time they are three years old. An ear infection most often affects the middle ear and is usually caused by bacteria. Fluid and mucus buildup behind the eardrum causing pressure and, eventually, pain. Ear infections usually follow a respiratory infection such as a cold or a sore throat. If the ear infection is bacterial, the bacteria will spread to the middle ear causing an ear infection. In a viral infection, the bacteria are "driven" to the middle ear by the virus, resulting in a secondary infection.


  • Article

    Early signs and symptoms of autism

    The signs of autism can show up early - even during infancy. While some children may have symptoms of autism at 6 months old, others will be symptom free until they are almost 2 years old. Most children with autism begin showing symptoms before the age of three.


  • Article

    Easy, healthy recipe: Cauliflower rice burrito bowl

    Many families struggle to eat the recommended five fruits and vegetables a day. It is a lofty goal, and you might have to get creative to meet it. One way to do this is to make cauliflower rice. In any dish that calls for rice, you can blend cauliflower in a food processor, sauté it until soft and use it as a base for your dish.


  • Video

    Easy-peasy pita pizza

    When hunger strikes in the middle of the day, why not try something simple yet yummy. Melissa Fossier, R.D.,L.D., a registered dietitian at Children's Health, makes a pita pizza in less than 15 minutes.


  • Article

    Eating healthier by eating together

    Things have changed since Tamika was a child. Back then, she says making healthy choices wasn't a priority. "Granny didn't allow us in the kitchen," she remembers. "This generation is much wiser, though." Her daughter Tanaya is a great example. Since graduating from Get Up & Go, she has encouraged her entire family to rethink their eating and exercise habits.


  • Article

    Egg allergies and the flu shot

    When fall comes around each year, it’s time to think about everyone in your family getting a flu shot, for their protection and to do your part to boost community health. But, if your child has an egg allergy, you may be concerned about the egg protein in the flu shot.


  • Article

    Fast Facts: Managing asthma in the winter

    Have you ever noticed that it's more difficult to breathe in the wintertime? That's because cold air causes your airways to contract. For kids with asthma, that constriction can make breathing much more difficult — and makes asthma attacks more likely. Meanwhile, other health conditions like the flu and respiratory infections are more common during colder months, and those can make asthma symptoms worse.


  • Article

    Fidget spinners Q & A with Children's Health experts

    Fidget spinners are the most popular gadgets of the moment amongst middle schoolers. But many teachers are finding them very distracting and banning them in the classroom, despite some people believing that they can improve focus in children with ADHD. Patricia Rodriguez, M.D., a pediatrician at Children's Health, and Roshini Kumar, Clinical Therapist, LCP, in the Pediatric Outpatient Psychiatry department at Children's Health answer some questions about the choking hazards of fidget spinners and healthier ways hyperactive children can burn off excess energy.


  • Article

    First Aid and CPR for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Children

    While rare, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) can affect infants, children and teens and can be fatal if cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not administered quickly – usually in a matter of minutes. Structural or functional problems with a child’s heart, arrhythmias or genetic syndromes can increase the risk of SCA. And, while some of these conditions are identified, monitored and treated from birth, certain rhythmic or structural problems don’t produce symptoms and may not be diagnosed unless caught on an unrelated screening or found in a family member. Certain serious injuries and allergic reactions can also lead to SCA.



  • Article

    Food Allergies — Educational Resources

    The Food Allergy Center at Children’s Health℠ Children's Medical Center is working toward finding a cure and improving the quality of life for children and families dealing with food allergies. If your child has food allergies, refer to the following list of resources that was developed by our pediatric food allergy experts.


  • Article

    Food allergies don’t have to dampen the spirit of the holidays

    With the holidays around the corner, most parents are looking forward to their child’s Thanksgiving feast, school Christmas parties and family meals. But for me and many others whose children have food allergies, it can be a scary and stressful time of year. Most holiday foods contain at least one of the top eight allergens – milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, tree nuts and peanuts. For example, Elliekate, my 3-year-old daughter, has a severe food allergy to eggs, tree nuts, peanuts and sesame. She cannot have the traditional recipes for most all holiday foods including sweet potato casserole, stuffing or pie.


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Chocolate Cake

    We’re sharing recipes for an entire food-allergy-friendly holiday meal. You’ll want to try them all! The following Chocolate Cake is allergy-friendly recipe and is free of peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. It's also gluten and dairy free.


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Herbed Prime Rib Roast

    Recent research shows that 1 in every 13 children in the United States has a food allergy, that’s approximately 2 children in every classroom. The following recipe is free of peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. This week, we’re sharing recipes for an entire food-allergy-friendly holiday meal. You’ll want to try them all!


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Holiday Berry Sauce

    Even if your kids don’t have food allergies, it’s likely that this holiday season you’ll be cooking for one of your kids’ cousins or friends who is allergic to one of the top eight food-allergy triggers (milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat).


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Sweet Potato Apple Casserole

    We’re sharing directions for Sweet Potato Apple Casserole. In the United States 90% of all food allergic reactions are caused by just eight foods: peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. This week we’re sharing directions for an entire food-allergy-friendly holiday meal. You’ll want to try them all!


  • Video

    Four lives changed in one week, without missing a beat

    From just 12 weeks to 12 years old, four special patients received new hearts all in the same week at the Heart Center at Children’s Health℠. Watch the video above to meet Abby, Adriel, Alex and Phoenix – and celebrate their incredible journey to a renewed opportunity for a happy, healthy life.


  • Article

    Fractured vertebra: More common than you think in young athletes

    Your young athlete works hard to be at the top of their game. It can be difficult to know what aches are normal and what pains need a doctor’s attention. If your child frequently bends or twists their back during sports and they experience frequent lower back pain, it might be time to ask their doctor about spondylolysis.


  • Video

    Easy, healthy recipe: EGGstraordinary Frittatas

    Breakfast is an EGGcelent way to start the day. Why not try something simple yet extraordinarily delicious to get your kids EGGcited. Melissa Fossier, R.D.,L.D., a registered dietitian at Children’s Health℠, whips up a delicious recipe for egg frittatas. Using three different food groups, this recipe is EGGstra healthy and sure to satisfy your kids' hunger.


  • Article

    Fuel your young athlete: How to pack a performance lunch

    During the school year, young athletes are busier than ever, juggling school work along with practice and, in many cases, multiple training sessions per day. Noel Williams, registered dietitian with Children's Health Andrews Institute Sports Performance powered by EXOS, says proper nutrition is key for students to stay healthy and meet the demands of their day.




  • Article

    Hanna’s Story: Expert care when she needed it most

    For Hanna, age 11, and her family, July 2, 2016, started off just like any other Texas summer day. They were out at their friend's house, the sun was out, and it was hot. The older kids had gone up to the barn to feed the horses while Hanna found refuge from the Texas heat in the shade of a tree. Though it's not clear exactly how it happened, a John Deere Gator™ utility vehicle slipped out of gear and rolled down the hill towards Hanna, crushing her against the tree.


  • Article

    Healthier Triple Mac n Cheese

    Like most, your Thanksgiving meal probably means a feast of many different sides in addition to the turkey and desserts. But there's no reason why you couldn't prepare healthy versions of those sides to help make the meal a bit more nutritious.


  • Article

    Healthy Pumpkin Pie is a Family-Favorite Recipe

    It sounds contradictory, but not all sweets have to be bad for you. Often, what makes sweets unhealthy in the first place is that we eat too much of them. So, when thinking about ways to keep your children healthy through the holidays, consider healthy alternatives to traditional treats, and remember to emphasize portion control at every meal, party and snack-time.


  • Article

    Healthy Resolutions - A family affair

    Olivia Munger, is a Registered Dietitian in the Children’s Health Get Up & Go program, gives parents three tips for a healthier new year.


  • Article

    Healthy food swaps

    Eating healthy doesn’t mean you have to give up taste! These healthy food swaps are easy ways to cut back on extra calories and reduce sources of refined sugar and simple carbohydrates – all without sacrificing texture or flavor. Even your kids will love it!





  • Article

    Help your child stay motivated in school

    It's not news that not all children enjoy school. If your child dreads going to school each day or simply seems uninterested in working hard in school, their motivation for learning may be an issue. You can help your child get excited about school at any age by getting involved and providing the right sort of praise. To help your child stay motivated academically, below are a few key strategies.


  • Article

    Your Guide to Hives: Identify, Treat and Prevent Urticaria in Children

    When you find hives on your child, you may worry about their cause. Does your child have a serious allergy to a certain food or chemical? Is he or she on the verge of a viral infection? These reddish or pinkish raised bumps, sometimes with a white center, can have a variety of – mostly mild – causes, from allergies and illnesses to stress and weather. They are often very itchy.



  • Video

    How can parents give kids confidence to deal with bullying?

    Parents often want to know what they can do in their own interactions with their kids to give them the confidence to deal with bullying. In this video, Celia Heppner, Psy.D., clinical psychologist at Children's Health, shares the importance of modeling healthy behaviors for children.


  • Video

    How can parents help children open up about bullying?

    One reason a child might be hesitant to tell a parent about bullying is fear about how a parent will react and fear of receiving unwanted attention at school if their parent intervenes. In this video, Celia Heppner, Psy.D., clinical psychologist at Children's Health, shares strategies for parents to help their children be open in their communication about bullying.


  • Video

    How can parents talk to their children about bullying?

    Parents often want to know the best way to talk to their kids about bullying. In this video, Celia Heppner, Psy.D., clinical psychologist at Children's Health, shares tips for keeping lines of communication open about the topic.


  • Article

    How do I talk to my teen about sexual violence and harassment?

    It's rare to watch or read the news without coming across stories covering bullying and the increased efforts that schools are taking to prevent such behavior from occurring on school grounds. But what about sexual violence in schools? After all, research has shown that verbal bullying and teasing in middle schools predicts later perpetration of sexual harassment by those same students.


  • Article

    How do pitch counts keep young athletes healthy?

    Over 2.4 million children around the world will participate in youth baseball leagues each year, and at some point, many of those participants will pitch. Most leagues have a "pitch count" rule, so that each player is individually monitored. Jeff Baggett, certified athletic trainer and outreach program manager at Children's Health Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, says that these rules are in place not necessarily to create fair play – but to protect the safety of our young athletes.


  • Article

    How to Handle Bedwetting in older kids

    Every child wets the bed now and then, especially children who are five years old or younger. But when your older child experiences nighttime bedwetting, you might be concerned about their health.


  • Article

    How to navigate accommodations and modifications in public schools

    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, children with disabilities, including learning, intellectual or physical disabilities, are required to receive extra support in public schools. By law, your child should have a 504 plan or an Individualized Education Program (IEP) that outlines what accommodations and modifications they need in school.


  • Article

    How to pack fresh, fit school lunches

    Parents, now that the break is over for your little ones, it's time to start thinking about school lunches again. Making, packing and taking lunches from home ensures your kids get a healthy, well-balanced meal at school.


  • Article

    How to spot and stop bullying

    Whether your child is being bullied or acting like a bully at school, these behaviors can affect their self-esteem, relationships, and mental health. As a parent, you can help protect your child’s emotional well-being by watching out for the signs of bullying and getting your child the help they need.


  • Article

    How to support the parents of a child with cancer

    When a child in your community is diagnosed with cancer, it's natural to want to help, but you might not always know how to lend a hand. "It's so hard because every parent copes differently," says Mary Van Meter, certified child life specialist at Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Health. "Many parents say it is hard to hear 'I'm so sorry.' Rather, it’s important to focus on the positive statements of, 'We are in this with you. Whatever you need, we're here.'"


  • Article

    Hypospadias: What you should know

    Hypospadias is a birth defect where the meatus isn’t on the tip of the penis. Instead, the meatus appears on the underside of the penis. In minor forms of the condition, the meatus is still on the head of the penis, just a little below the tip. In more severe forms, the meatus may appear as far back as the scrotum.


  • Article

    In case you MIST it: Nasal flu vaccine gets shelved

    If you are like many parents, the nasal mist option made it much easier to ensure your child was vaccinated against the flu. You didn’t have to worry about your child’s fear of needles or the screams of terror and fall-down tantrums leading up to the injection. Plus, the post-vaccination ice cream or cookie treat became more of an option than a promise.


  • Article

    Influenza — Educational Resources

    To help your family stay healthy during flu season, the infectious disease experts from Children’s Health℠ have developed resources about the flu.


  • Article

    Is my child at risk of developing sleep apnea?

    You've probably heard of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the most common type of sleep apnea, which causes pauses in breathing during sleep. You may even know an adult who has the condition, but did you know that it can affect kids too? Sleep apnea is a health condition that affects 2 to 3 percent of children up to age 18 – and it's on the rise in this population.


  • Video

    Is that dog friendly? Tips on helping your children avoid dog bites

    During the summertime, dog bites rise due to the increased amount of time both dogs and children spend outside. Whether it is an unfamiliar dog or family dog, all dogs can bite and need to be approached carefully. Keep your family safe this summer by following tips from our expert.


  • Article

    Is your teen at risk for online challenges?

    As teens grow and learn, their brains are programmed to seek out new and different experiences, which can make a challenge on social media so appealing. Some of these online trends carry a positive goal, such as altruistic video challenges raising money for a worthy cause. Others, however, involve risky behaviors that are much more dangerous — sometimes even deadly. Teens have suffered severe injuries and some have even been killed while trying to be part of this craze.


  • Article

    A young patient stays positive by helping others

    When Jack was just three years old, he was visiting a fountain at the park with his grandma – an x-ray technician – when she noticed a bump on his right side. He saw his pediatrician the next day who referred him to Children’s Health for a scan, which revealed a mass growing on his right kidney.


  • Article

    Keep your children safe when riding all-terrain vehicles

    For many Texans, ATVs are a way of life—used not only for recreation but for work on the farm or ranch. What many people don’t realize is that injuries from all-terrain vehicles caused 50 hospital admissions in 2016. Children should always wear proper safety equipment including a helmet. They should also ride the vehicle that is most appropriate for their age.


  • Article

    Keep your young athlete healthy

    It may come as a surprise to many parents, but sports-related injuries are the second leading cause of emergency room visits in children and adolescents across the country. And Texas is no exception. Home to more than 7 million youth and an ever-increasing population of young athletes, Texas is a hotbed for sports injuries among children.



  • Article

    Kidney stones can happen to kids too

    Most people think of kidney stones as an adults-only condition, but anyone can get them, and that means children too. A kidney stone is a pebbly substance that forms in a child’s kidney if the urine mineral level is too high. Kidney stones must be treated by a health care professional.


  • Article

    Kids in the kitchen: Cooking safety rules for children

    The process of cooking involves a variety of skills that we seldom think about as adults, says Olivia Munger, a Registered Dietitian in the Children's Health Get Up & Go program. The math you use when calculating measurements, understanding the science behind browning onions and the motor skills needed for dicing garlic are all abilities you began developing as a child. When you involve children in the cooking process, they not only become familiar with different foods and how to cook them, they also learn age-appropriate developmental skills. Children can begin helping with basic meal preparation as young as 2 years old. Get them started early washing produce or measuring ingredients, and by the time they reach preteen years, they will be able to make a few simple dishes with minimal direction from you.



  • Article

    Toddler training 101: Toilets and sleep

    Toddlers have a lot to learn. Just as they are mastering basic motor skills and early speech, they also need to start learning how to use the potty and sleep in a "big kid" bed. Below are tips on how you can successfully train your little one to use the potty and sleep in their own bed.


  • Article

    Let's talk about constipation in kids

    Does your child have fewer than two bowel movements a week, or have stool that is hard, dry, small and difficult to pass? If so, your child is probably suffering from constipation. A fairly common condition in children of all ages, about 5% of visits to pediatricians and 25% of visits to pediatric gastroenterologists are due to constipation.


  • Article

    Living with Lupus: Answers to questions about Lupus in children

    Lupus is a type of autoimmune disease, which means a person's immune system attacks healthy tissues and organs instead of just harmful invaders like bacteria, viruses and fungi. In systemic lupus erythematosus, also known as SLE or just lupus, the immune system may attack and inflame the skin, joints, kidneys, lungs, nervous system and other organs.


  • Article

    Luis' story: Cancer survivor, writer and budding scientist

    Luis Angel was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, a rare cancer of the retina, when he was just 7 months old. It’s a day his mother, Crissty, will never forget for two reasons. First, the obvious: It was the day the terms cancer, chemotherapy, survival rate and prognosis entered their vocabulary. But even more than that, it was also the first time Luis called her mama. Understandably, Crissty likes to focus on the latter milestone.


  • Article

    Managing childhood allergies

    Your child's immune system works overtime to protect her from disease. It produces antibodies that attack foreign invaders like germs and pathogens so your child won't get sick. Sometimes, though, the immune system makes antibodies for substances that aren't harmful, such as pollen, pet dander or certain foods. When that happens, it's known as an allergic reaction. Allergies are very common in children.


  • Article

    Managing chronic diseases at school

    Children with chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes or epilepsy need extra attention at school to stay safe and healthy. With the right treatment plan and support, children with these conditions can flourish at school without putting their health at risk.



  • Article

    Mending the tiniest of faces

    Manuel Rodriguez remembers the moment he realized that his baby girl born with a cleft lip and palate would be okay. "As soon as we met her surgeon, we knew she was in the best hands possible," Manuel says. James Seaward, M.D., plastic and craniofacial surgeon at Children’s Health and Assistant Professor of Pediatric Plastic and Craniofacial Surgery at UT Southwestern, met Manuel and his wife, Belinda, after an ultrasound revealed the cleft lip and palate. Their baby, Wendy, would need surgery to repair it.


  • Article

    More than just the blues: Signs of depression in children

    Does your child seem unusually sad, irritable or quiet lately? Such changes in mood could be due to a temporary stress in life. But how do you know if it's something more? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2.1% of children between the ages of 3 and 17 have a current diagnosis of depression.


  • Article

    Music and medicine help young man overcome kidney disease

    When Jireh was 14 years old, his mom Sharonda rushed him to the doctor on a weekend because she was afraid he was having an extreme allergic reaction to something he had eaten. His face had swollen up significantly and, initially, his doctor came to the same conclusion but asked for a urine sample just in case. To everyone’s surprise, the urinalysis detected there was blood in the sample, and Jireh was referred to Children’s Health for additional testing.


  • Article

    New fruit juice guidelines Q&A with Children’s Health expert

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recently updated their fruit juice guidelines, recommending no fruit juice for children under 1 year. Denon Stacy, Clinical Dietitian, MS, RD, CSP, LD from Clinical Nutrition at Children's Health answered a few questions regarding the new recommendations.


  • Article

    Be in the know about Norovirus and kids

    A norovirus causes inflammation of the stomach and intestines, also known as gastroenteritis. Often referred to as "stomach flu," this infection is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in the United States - causing diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, fatigue and mild fever in more than 20 million people each year.


  • Article

    Opioid use in adolescents

    Many parents may be surprised to learn the rise in opioid use isn't limited to adults. A new study has found that the number of young people who were diagnosed in emergency rooms with opioid use disorder or addiction is on the rise.


  • Article

    Over the counter medicine

    If a medicine doesn't require a prescription, many parents assume it's safe for their child to take. That's not always the case. Children often need smaller doses than adults take, while other medications aren't meant for kids at all. At Children’s, we want all kids to feel better, but we also want them to be safe.


  • Article

    Pertussis can be fatal to your child – everyone should get vaccinated

    Pertussis is a highly contagious illness of the respiratory mucous membrane. It’s marked by a series of short, violent coughs sometimes followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like whoop. A type of bacteria called Bordetella pertussis causes this infectious disease. The bacteria attach to the cilia (tiny, hair-like extensions) that line the upper respiratory system. Bordetella pertussis toxins (poisons) damage the cilia and cause airways to swell.


  • Article

    You can win the picky eater battle

    "We tend to think of young children as picky eaters because by nature they are suspicious of new foods, and at this age they start exerting their independence in the form of saying 'no!'" says Olivia Munger, a Registered Dietitian with the Children's Health℠ Get Up and Go program.


  • Article

    Pink Eye — Educational Resources

    Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, is an inflammation of the thin membrane that covers the inner eyelids and white surface of the eye.


  • Article

    Prescription for safety: Medication dosage, storage and more

    Every year in the U.S., more than 60,000 kids wind up in emergency rooms because they were messing around with medicine — unsupervised. Medications typically have bright, happy colors, funny shapes, some even look and taste like candy, so why wouldn’t kids be tempted to explore the medicine cabinet or mom’s purse?


  • Article

    Help your family prevent cycling injuries this Spring

    Studies estimate that large numbers of these cyclists experience physical problems: 48 percent in their necks, 42 percent in their knees, 36 percent in the groin and buttocks, 31 percent in their hands, and 30 percent in the back. No matter why they use a bicycle, young people can follow some basic safety principles to avoid common cycling injuries.


  • Article

    RSV can be serious in infants

    Respiratory syncytial virus, commonly known as RSV, is a specific virus that has similar symptoms to the common cold, but causes inflammation of the bronchioles (the smallest of the air passageways in the lungs). "RSV causes what we call bronchiolitis, which is different than bronchitis," explains LeAnn Kridelbaugh, M.D., President of Children’s Health Pediatric Group. "The difference is that bronchitis is infection or inflammation in the large airways or breathing tubes and RSV affects the bronchioles, which are much tinier breathing tubes. And in young infants, they are very tiny."


  • Article

    Rashes — Educational Resources

    A rash is a patch of red, inflamed skin that may be itchy, painful or swollen. Rashes are common in kids and can be the result of many things, including allergies, infections or irritants. Most rashes are easily treated and clear up quickly. If your child's rash lingers or doesn't respond to medications, call your doctor.


  • Article

    Rebecca's story

    By the time she was 9 years old, Rebecca had already undergone eight surgeries to correct her cleft lip, a congenital craniofacial deformity affecting approximately one in 700 newborns in the U.S. Now, by the age of 17, she's had three additional surgeries, with one final procedure scheduled this December. She's faced challenges – physically and emotionally – that no child should have to bear. Through it all, however, if there’s one word to describe her, it's strong.


  • Article

    Ride your bike smart and safe

    If you're a Baby Boomer or part of Generation X, you may or may not have worn a bicycle helmet when you cruised around the neighborhood with your friends. These days, we're a lot safer. Most kids learn to put their helmet on first before they even test out their first pair of training wheels.


  • Article

    Riding a bike to school

    For many kids, riding their bike to school is a rite of passage. It means you're one of the big kids, the cool kids. But dangers abound, even for older children, when traveling to school. In 2011 we had 10 patients sustain injuries that required admission to Children's Health℠ after being hit by a car while riding their bike and one of these children died.


  • Article

    SIDS and keeping your baby safe

    If you're a new parent or a parent-to-be, you’re likely aware of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome). SIDS is the unexplained death of an infant less than 1 year of age, and while the causes may be unknown, there are steps you can take to reduce your baby's risk.



  • Article

    Safety tips for kids walking to school

    The danger of walking to school has never been greater than it is now with texting, tweeting and phone calls to distract drivers. During the back-to-school season — in August and September — at Children's Medical Center, the Emergency Department sees an increase in trauma-related pedestrian, bicycle and school bus injuries. Last year, there were 83 patients admitted to Children's after suffering injuries from being hit by a car while walking and six of these children died. Many of these injuries and those like it are preventable by following some simple safety guidelines. "The most common injury we see from children walking to school is a vehicle collision with a human," said Claudia Romo, program manager for Injury Prevention at Children's Health℠. "These injuries can range from scrapes and bruises to multiple fractures, head and brain injuries."


  • Article

    School bus safety tips

    "The big yellow dog," school buses, are supposed to deliver our children safely to school. But even still, during the back-to-school season — in August and September — at Children’s Medical Center, the Emergency Department sees an increase in trauma-related pedestrian, bicycle and even school bus injuries. And many of which are preventable by following some simple safety guidelines.



  • Article

    Screening for heart disease in children

    In another recent post, you learned how childhood obesity can be a significant risk factor for heart disease, especially when it’s accompanied by factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or prediabetes, physical inactivity and an unhealthy diet. The first line of defense against childhood obesity includes incorporating more physical exercise and nutritious foods into a child’s lifestyle.


  • Article

    Seizures — Educational Resources

    Improving seizure care for children in North Texas is a top priority for the team at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Children’s Health℠ Children’s Medical Center Dallas. With this goal in mind, our pediatric epilepsy specialists have put together a list of resources to assist families and other health care providers with the management of seizures.


  • Article

    Sepsis in children: Know the signs

    When a child or adult has an infection, the body's immune system kicks into gear to fight it off. When faced with a viral infection, like a cold or flu, or a bacterial infection, like strep, a child may experience symptoms like fever, sore throat, body aches and headache. Those symptoms are usually manageable and a healthy immune response ensures the child will recover fully within a few days.


  • Article

    Seven simple tips for safe trick-or-treating

    The spookiest day of the year is quickly sneaking up on us. So you're probably already on your way to being knee deep in pumpkins, costumes, candy and creating great Halloween memories for your child.


  • Article

    Can Children Get Shingles? Yes, But They’re Preventable.

    Shingles, as well as the once-common childhood illness chickenpox, are both caused by the varicella (or herpes) zoster virus. Prior to the invention of the chickenpox vaccine, nearly everyone developed chickenpox, usually during childhood. This put everyone – including children – at risk for shingles, a skin rash caused by viral infection of the nerves just below the skin.


  • Article

    Should I worry about my child's BMI? Body mass index explained

    BMI measurements can cause a lot of frustration and confusion for parents. Kids are growing and need to eat well to gain weight during childhood. Like adults, kids come in all shapes and sizes, but a person’s weight in childhood is a strong predictor of their weight in adulthood, so it is important to monitor.



  • Article

    Sideline medical tents offer peace of mind

    At high school sports games throughout the region, you may notice something new on the sidelines: a medical tent. Each year, more than 2.6 million children are treated nationwide for sports-related injuries. To help care for these injuries, Children's Health Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine strives to use pioneering techniques to evaluate young athletes on the field.


  • Article

    Spine injury: Children in sports at risk for slipped disks

    Young athletes face their share of bumps and scrapes, but first aid kits aren’t the solution to every injury. If your child has recurring lower back pain or spondylolysis, they may be at risk for spondylolisthesis, a slipped disk in the spine.


  • Article

    Sports drinks: Are they actually healthy? 

    Over the last few years, many people have gotten the message that sugar-containing sodas are not a healthy choice for their family and have started to buy less of these drinks. However, as soda drinking declines, more people are buying sports and energy drinks thinking they are healthier alternatives. Marketing for these drinks features professional athletes and promises increased energy and athletic performance. If a drink is good enough for top athletes, it must be good for the general public, right?


  • Article

    Spring Cleaning Tips for Including the Kids

    The weather’s getting warmer, birds are chirping, flowers are blooming – and you’re likely holding a mile-long spring cleaning list. Spring cleaning holds many benefits. If you or anyone in your family suffers from allergies, ridding the house of lingering dust, mold and pollen can bring some relief. Spring cleaning reduces the bacteria you live with, resulting in a healthier environment. Plus, after a season of family gatherings, indoor activities, holiday gifts and school projects, you’re probably craving a little fresher air and open space inside your home.


  • Article

    Stephanie's story

    Stephanie loves dancing. But after joining the dance team at her high school and wearing ponytails on a regular basis, all Stephanie could think about during performances was whether people noticed her ears.


  • Article

    Strep Throat — Educational Resources

    Strep throat is an infection caused by highly contagious streptococcal bacteria. It can spread through coughing, sneezing or sharing food or drinks. At Children's Health, we see lots of kids with strep throat, especially during cold and flu season. If your think your child may have strep throat, see your doctor. Although strep itself isn't dangerous, it can lead to complications that may be.


  • Infographic

    Stroke Awareness [Infographic]

    Strokes can happen at any age. Be sure to know the symptoms and what to do if you spot them. Act F.A.S.T.


  • Article

    Strokes: Kids can have them too

    It’s not just the elderly who have strokes. In children, strokes are often due to blood clotting problems, congenital heart disease, infection or other long term conditions like Sickle Cell Disease. A pediatric neurologist at Children’s Health explains the signs and symptoms of stroke in children


  • Article

    Stronger together: A mom and daughter take control of their health

    In spring 2016, Sandra Hernandez took her 10-year-old daughter Abby for her annual check-up. There, the physician shared that her daughter’s glucose levels were high. With a long family history of diabetes, Sandra knew it was time to act. She wanted to give her daughter more control over her health.



  • Article

    Sun Safety Tips for Kids

    It's warming up, and outdoor activities are in full swing. With temperatures increasing fast and skin cancer on the rise in young adults, it's important to protect your kids from the hot Texas sun. These sun safety tips will help you do just that.


  • Article

    Surgery breathes new life into an active teen

    When John started puberty, he noticed a shallow indentation in his chest. After a rapid growth spurt at age 13, the indentation became much more noticeable and began affecting him physically. Soccer games with friends became more challenging due to shortness of breath, and he began wearing a bandana around his neck to hide his chest.


  • Article

    Surgery gives a young man a new chance at life

    Jacob had always been noticeably bigger than his peers – a characteristic that his Pee Wee football coaches viewed as an advantage during elementary school. Some of his classmates, however, weren't always as kind.


  • Article

    Survival guide: Your young athlete and two-a-days practices

    These extra training sessions help to accelerate physical conditioning, skill development and team cohesion. However, athletes can experience increased amounts of physical and psychological stress during these multi-session practices. Troy Smurawa, M.D., is the Director of Pediatric Sports Medicine at the Children’s Health℠ Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. He shares a few tips to help your athlete survive two-a-days and extended practices while gearing up for a great season by getting the most out of each workout.



  • Article

    Surviving the time change with a toddler

    When daylight saving time changes come around, or you need to adjust your child’s sleep schedule for other reasons, you should take careful steps to change the bedtime routine.


  • Article

    Surviving two-a-day or prolonged practices

    Beginning for many youth athletes in late July or early August, two-a-day practice sessions are a common part of early-season conditioning in football and other fall sports. These extra training sessions help to accelerate physical conditioning, skill development and team development; however, athletes experience increased amounts of physical, mental and other types of stress during these multi-session practice days as they manage high energy demands, limited recovery time and increased worry of making the team or earning a starting position. The heat and humidity of summer practices add additional stresses as well.


  • Article

    Sweet potato turkey chili

    This hearty chili tastes indulgent, but it is actually good for you! The carrots and sweet potatoes pack a healthy punch with vitamin A, potassium and fiber, while the spices add flavor.


  • Article

    Talking to your children about tragic events

    When a disaster or tragedy occurs, your child will likely hear and see a lot about it. The news is everywhere, and certain topics might be discussed in school or by your child’s friends. Certain events could raise anxiety, so parents should be prepared to talk about these to their children.


  • Article

    Talking with your child about suicide

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults, according to the CDC. Most suicide attempts in children and adolescents occur in the midst of depression or other mood disorders. Nearly one in five high schoolers have seriously considered suicide within the past 12 months, and about 8% have made an attempt. Many do not want to die, but they feel ambivalent (i.e., have mixed feelings) about life and simply want to end emotional or physical pain. Suicide is 100% preventable and there are effective treatments to help. Dr. Nicholas J. Westers, a clinical psychologist at Children’s Health, offers the following advice for parents.


  • Article

    A young girl shows her strength as she battles Leukemia

    Tatum had just returned from a fun weekend in San Antonio celebrating her grandmother’s 65th birthday when she started to run a fever. It didn’t go down by the next morning and she began having trouble walking so her mom, Whitney, took her to her pediatrician’s office to figure out what was going on. She tested negative for strep, but her blood work came back abnormal so her doctor urged them to go directly to the emergency room at Children’s Medical Center Plano.


  • Article

    Teaching your child about physical differences

    One of the most important lessons parents can teach their children is to be accepting and compassionate to those who look different from them. But, it can also be one of the most challenging lessons to teach. Celia Heppner, Psy.D., plastic and craniofacial surgery psychologist at Children's Health and assistant professor of psychiatry at UT Southwestern, explains that teaching your child about physical differences begins at a young age and continues throughout childhood and the teenage years.


  • Article

    Teal Pumpkin Project: Alternative Halloween treats for kids with allergies, diabetes or other needs

    Having a child with a food allergy or diabetes impacts nearly every aspect of life – including how he or she can participate in holidays and related celebrations. Festive autumnal celebrations nearly always include candy and treats, and it can be heartbreaking to tell a child with a food allergy that he or she can’t participate in the merriment of trick-or-treating on Halloween night.



  • Article

    The danger outside your open window

    When it’s a beautiful day, opening your windows for some fresh air might seem like a good idea. But, what you may not realize is that your children could be at risk for a serious injury when you open your windows.


  • Article

    The facts about summer sun safety

    When it comes to buying the right sunscreen, there are so many choices you may not know which is best. Sunscreen, or sunblock, protects skin against the sun's ultraviolet A (UVA) ultraviolet B (UVB) rays, which cause sunburn.



  • Article

    The importance of sleep in preventing type 2 diabetes

    You probably already know how important it is for your child to get enough sleep – but you may be surprised to learn that children who get more sleep actually have fewer risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. A study published by researchers at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) found that the longer children in the study slept, the lower their insulin, insulin resistance and glucose levels.


  • Article

    The new normal: How to holiday after separation

    For recently separated or divorced families, the holidays can bring an acute sense of hurtful emotions and anxiety. The tug-of-war over who will get the kids, combined with the frustrations of fluctuating schedules and loss of routine, can lead to an unhealthy environment for children and a potentially profound emotional impact on them later in life.


  • Article

    Three quick tips to help boost your child's body image

    In an interview with the Mirror in April 2014, a British teen with body dysmorphic disorder described spending up to 10 hours a day taking hundreds of photos of himself at a time in pursuit of the perfect selfie. He admitted that he eventually attempted suicide in response to his dissatisfaction with his appearance in selfies. Although taking selfies did not cause this young man’s body dysmorphic disorder, one way in which his disorder manifested itself was his preoccupation with taking an "ideal" selfie.


  • Article

    Tick-Tock: Time to adjust your child’s sleep schedule

    As your family’s extended break from school comes to an end, one important item that may be missing from your back-to-school checklist – or may be started too late – is transitioning your student’s sleep from a break-time schedule back to a routine school-night schedule.


  • Article

    Tips to help motivate your child to exercise

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, children should get one hour of exercise each day. "Exercise is at the forefront of physical health," says Performance Manager Josh Adams, M.S., C.S.C.S., Children's Health Andrews Institute Sports Performance powered by EXOS. "Exercise helps children strengthen growing muscles and bones and is part of a healthy lifestyle, combined with quality nutrition and adequate sleep."




  • Article

    Turn your child’s screen time into an opportunity for learning

    You know too much screen time is not a good thing for your child. But what about when that screen time is used to build skills in math, science and reading? There are a wide variety of educational apps that can keep your child entertained while learning at the same time.



  • Article

    Understanding executive functions

    If you child forgets their homework, can't stay on task, has trouble being flexible to new plans, or acts impulsively, they may be facing challenges with executive functions.


  • Article

    Urinary Tract Infection in children: Know the signs and next steps

    UTIs in children are very common and very treatable. To prevent complications, it's best to call your child's doctor to get treatment as soon as you notice symptoms. What are the symptoms of UTI in children? Urethra infection and bladder infection are the most common forms of UTI in children, but these infections can also affect the ureters and kidneys. If your child has a UTI, you may notice:


  • Article

    Vacation checklist – healthy travel tips

    Whether you're taking a day trip to a nearby town or traveling across the country to see the sites, you'll need essential supplies to keep your children happy and healthy along the way.


  • Article

    Vaccines protect children from crippling or fatal diseases

    Vaccines protect children from getting sick from many crippling or deadly illnesses. Thanks to decades of immunization, diseases like measles and polio are mostly a thing of the past in the U.S. "Despite what you may have heard, vaccines are quite safe for children," says Jeffrey Kahn, M.D., Director of Infectious Disease at Children’s. "In fact, the risks to your child from catching the diseases vaccines prevent far outweigh any threat posed by the vaccines themselves."


  • Article

    Valentine's Day FYI: Is chocolate really good for your heart?

    Chocolate is a by-product of the cocoa bean or cacao bean. In the 15th and 16th centuries, people in Mexico made a foamy drink with the cacao bean, and spiced it with chili, allspice, honey or vanilla. The beverage was expensive to make and enjoyed mostly by the elite. It wasn’t until the 18th century that the first form of solid chocolate was developed in Italy. Today more than 50 percent of the cocoa harvested annually comes from West Africa. In the United States market alone, chocolate sales average over $19 billion a year. Consumers demand for the organic version of chocolate is also on the rise.


  • Article

    Veggie chips are nutritious, right?

    How healthy are veggie chips? Laura Walker, a registered dietitian with the Children's Health Get Up and Go program, shares the details.


  • Article

    Watch out for white eyes in photos

    As a parent, your phone and camera are probably full of hundreds of photos of your child smiling, sleeping, drooling and laughing. Every one of these photos is just a little piece of history, and proof for the future that your child was once tiny and babbling.


  • Article

    What Is Turf Toe anyway: Common sports injuries explained

    As the new football season kicks off across the nation, you’ll probably be hearing a lot about "turf toe." I know what you’re thinking, and no, turf toe isn’t an excess of green hair covering the feet of athletes. The term turf toe actually refers to a common injury among athletes of all different sports. While turf toe is most common in football players, it also affects players of other sports such as basketball, wrestling and gymnastics. Essentially, turf toe is a sprain of the tendons, usually around the big toe, that hold the joint in place. These tendons allow the big toe joint to function as a hinge that receives a lot of stress from the continued jumping and running motions that are common in sports.


  • Video

    What are signs of bullying parents can look for?

    If your child is being bullied at school, he or she might be hesitant to share that information with you. In this video, Celia Heppner, Psy.D., clinical psychologist at Children's Health, shares signs to look for if you suspect your child is being bullied or teased.


  • Article

    What is radiation-free heart catheterization and how does it protect young patients?

    Children born with congenital heart disease often need multiple tests and procedures, including X-ray-dependent cardiac catheterization. While these procedures can be helpful in diagnosing and treating heart conditions, they can also cause overexposure to radiation, especially in patients who will need multiple procedures over their lifetime — which can be harmful to your child's health.


  • Article

    What to do when your child has a fever

    When your child has a fever, it is a sign that their immune system is fighting off an infection. "The vast majority of infectious diseases that are associated with a high fever are caused by a virus, and are usually accompanied by coughing, congestion, vomiting or diarrhea," says LeAnn Kridelbaugh, M.D., President of Children's Health℠ Pediatric Group. "Fever can also coincide with an ear infection or strep throat as well as less common infections like pneumonia."


  • Article

    What to expect at your child's annual sports physical

    Every year, student athletes across Texas are required to get their annual sports physical or pre-participation physical exam before they start playing sports again. Sports physicals take a short amount of time, are typically low-cost and give you peace of mind that your child can safely compete.


  • Article

    When does the shape of a newborns head require medical attention?

    The shape of a newborn’s head is often a topic of discussion when a new member of the family arrives. Sometimes the head is a little pointed; sometimes it’s a little flat in a spot or two. This is usually nothing more than the normal effects of being born, according to Christopher Derderian, M.D., a member of the Plastic and Craniofacial Surgery team at Children’s Health℠.



  • Article

    When to take your child to an urgent care vs. the emergency room

    If your child is sick or hurt, it is important to seek the right level of care to meet their needs. Depending on their condition, you may need to visit an emergency department or an urgent care facility. But which is best? We're here to help you make the correct choice.


  • Article

    Why babies have a hard time falling asleep

    Nothing is more frustrating for you or your baby than when they have trouble going to sleep. When your little one is tired as can be, but still can’t manage to nod off, they may cry for hours on end.


  • Article

    Why childhood cancer survival rates are growing

    At the beginning of a child's cancer care, there is one treatment goal: survivorship. The majority of children with cancer will reach this goal. "Approximately 80% of children diagnosed with cancer will survive and grow up to adulthood," says Tanya Watt, M.D., pediatric oncologist at Children’s Health. "These rates are significantly better than the adult world."


  • Article

    Why cold medicines aren't always right for your child

    On average, children suffer from six to eight colds every year. These illnesses, caused by viruses, spread when germs get on toys, doorknobs or other surfaces from dirty hands, coughs or sneezes. Frequent handwashing, avoiding people who are sick, and coughing properly into your sleeve can help prevent the spread of colds. However, children are still likely to get sick because their immune system isn't as well developed as adults' systems.


  • Article

    Winter blues? Or something more serious

    Each winter you might notice a dip in your child’s mood and a change in his or her behavior, and then witness them return to being themselves again once springtime hits. You might even experience these seasonal changes yourself.


  • Article

    Let’s talk about your baby’s poop

    As much as you might not like to admit it, when you have a baby, you talk about poop at least once a day. It's not just that you find literally everything about your precious little one interesting - there is good reason to discuss what you find in their diapers. It turns out, your baby's poop can tell you a lot about their health.


  • Article

    Your child’s sleep affects their brain

    Sleep is vital for everyone’s brain health - but especially for growing and developing kids. Without enough sleep, certain brain functions may not work as effectively as they otherwise could.




  • Article

    Zika virus concerns and prevention

    Although first discovered in 1947 in the Zika forest of Uganda, Africa; the Zika virus has recently become a concern in other parts of the world; including South and Central America, the U.S., and locally here in Texas. Most of the population is not significantly impacted by Zika infections; however, others can incur serious ramifications.


  • Article

    A young girl shows strength as she battles cancer before her first birthday

    Her daughter, Zoe, had been dealing with a bout of what her gastroenterologist diagnosed as traveler’s diarrhea for about two months and wasn’t getting better, despite trying multiple antibiotics to treat it. The doctor assured Linda that it just took time for it to run its course, but her mother’s intuition told her that something wasn’t quite right. Linda finally decided enough was enough, and on February 14, she headed to the Emergency Department at Children’s Medical Center Plano for answers.

scroll to top