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Health & Wellness Library

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  • Article

    10 Ways to Keep Your Child's Heart Healthy

    Take charge of your child’s heart health by developing habits now that will reap benefits later in life. According to Dr. Colin Kane, pediatric cardiologist at Children’s Health, the most effective way to do this is to make healthy living a priority for the whole family.


  • Article

    3 Cool Rules for Being Safe in the Pool

    A swimming pool is a great place for kids to cool off. It's also a great place for kids to get into trouble when no one's looking. How well does your child swim? Pool safety starts before your child ever gets into the water and understanding your child’s skill level can help you make smart decisions about water safety. You can learn more about your child’s swimming ability by going to your local YMCA to receive a FREE swim assessment. If your child is not a strong swimmer, enroll him or her in swim classes. The YMCA offers swimming classes for children six months and up. Even children that pass a swim assessment can benefit from additional swim instruction. Learning the rules of the water and how to be a strong swimmer is a great defense against drowning.


  • Article

    5 Tips for Preventing Hot Car Deaths

    We all know that the Texas summer heat is serious business. But did you know that Texas leads the nation in hot car deaths? Each year an average of 10 children in Texas die from being left a hot car. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, on a relatively mild 80-degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise 19 degrees in just 10 minutes. And because a child's body heats up three to five times faster than an adult's, the risk of heat stroke, brain damage and death is much greater for children left in hot cars.



  • Article

    5 tips for an active, healthier winter

    As the winter months’ approach and the temperatures get cooler, many of us hibernate and seek out our favorite comfort foods. Making time for physical activity not only helps you offset all the holiday eating, but it can also help you create new family traditions around healthier behaviors. Following these five tips from the experts at our Get Up & Go program can help you get on the road to a healthier winter.


  • Article

    6 Questions to Ask When Looking for a Primary Care Pediatrician

    Choosing a primary care pediatrician to care for your child may be one of the most important decisions you'll make as a parent. "There are a lot of factors to consider when choosing a physician," says Ray Tsai,.D., president of MyChildren's Pediatric Practice. "A good place to start is to ask for referrals from friends and neighbors. You'll also want to look for a practice that's convenient to your home, has convenient hours and takes your insurance. Before you make a final decision, set up an appointment to see how the practice runs and what type of rapport you have with the physician and office staff."


  • Article

    6 Signs Your Child May Have an Eating Disorder

    Eating disorders are characterized by unhealthy approaches to eating, weight and exercise. But they are more than a refusal to eat healthy; eating disorders are complex psychiatric disorders. If your child has an eating disorder, he or she also might have problems with self-image, anxiety and even depression. As many as 30 million people in the United States have an eating disorder. The causes of eating disorders continue to be researched. Biological, sociological, psychological and cultural factors can all play a part in the development of an eating disorder.



  • Article

    7 Common Asthma Questions Parents Ask

    If you worry that your child might have asthma, or your child has recently been diagnosed, you probably have plenty of questions for the doctor. To make the most of your visit with the pediatrician, make a list of those questions and bring them with you. Here are seven questions you'll definitely want on the list:


  • Article

    7 tips for buying safe toys this holiday season

    Toys can be hazardous, resulting in hundreds of thousands of injuries each year for children age 14 or younger. As holiday time approaches, make informed decisions about toy purchases by keeping our tips in mind.


  • Article

    8 Facts about food allergies in children

    Allergies are one of the most common health conditions affecting children (age 0-17). Food allergies currently affect 4 - 6% of our youth in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the number of children diagnosed with food allergies is steadily increasing – up 18% in the past decade.


  • Article

    The big move: 8 ways to help your child adjust to a new school

    Some anxiety should be expected as the new school year gets underway. Every child is different and will handle change in his or her own unique way. Here are a few tips to help your child cope with a significant change in their school environment.


  • Article

    A deeper dive into pool safety rules

    We’ve already shared the three essential rules to pool safety. Now let’s dive deep into some more helpful water safety tips to keep your pool safe all year around.



  • Article

    Are you Prepared to Help your Child Cope with Anxiety?

    Anxiety disorders affect one in eight children and, if they go unrecognized and untreated, can lead to poor school performance or socialization, loss of sleep and even eventual substance abuse. While anxiety is a normal emotional response to stress, anxiety disorders are psychiatric illnesses characterized by constant and overwhelming worry or fear. Anxiety types and their symptoms can include.


  • Article

    Asthma

    The Asthma Management Program at Children’s Health℠ Children's Medical Center is an outpatient educational program that focuses on asthma education and self-management skills. With that goal in mind, our pediatric asthma experts have put together the following list of educational resources for patients and their families:


  • Article

    Back-to-School Anxiety: Ways to Help Your Child Cope

    A new school year can trigger feelings of anxiety in children of all ages. There are new classes, teachers, friends and pressures -- all mixed with the physical changes that come with growing up. As a parent, you are the first responder in your child’s life when they are feeling anxious.


  • Article

    Back-to-School Nutrition Tips

    With kids returning to school, we thought it would be a perfect time to ask Kara Gann, a Clinical Dietitian at Children's Health, for some back-to-school nutrition tips. Eating breakfast is the best way to start the day, for children and adults alike. To encourage your kids to fuel up before school, sit down and eat with them. The act of eating breakfast together models that breakfast is important. If a rushed morning routine keeps you from sitting down for breakfast, set aside 10 to 15 extra minutes to eat. Wake up just a little bit earlier if needed.


  • Article

    Backyard trampolines are not safe for children

    Although jumping, bouncing and summersaulting on trampolines may be fun for kids, it’s not worth the risk. About 100,000 children, in the U.S., are injured on trampolines every year, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.


  • Article

    Springtime Recipe: Beanie Burgers

    We asked the dietitians from our Get Up & Go team to offer up healthy, delicious recipes that fit the spring season. These beanie burgers are light, tasty and a great alternative to the fast food options that many families choose.



  • Article

    Bullying at School: Helping Your Child Deal This Fall

    We asked Melissa Faith, Ph.D., ABPP, and Celia Heppner, Psy.D., Children’s Health℠ pediatric psychologists, for some helpful insights, what signs to look for and how a concerned parent can help their child cope with the issue of bullying. According to stopbullying.gov, bullying is defined as unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. An estimated 75% of children are bullied at least once during their school career, and 10-20% of children are bullied repeatedly over a much longer period of time. Children who are bullied repeatedly over a long period of time are at most risk of problems with behavior, mood, school performance and family or social relationships.


  • Article

    Just the Facts: Busting 6 Asthma Myths

    The spring and summer seasons bring on higher pollen counts, more humidity and changes in air quality, which means it's asthma season. Our knowledge of this condition is constantly improving, but plenty of myths have stuck around. Let's set the record straight about your child's asthma.



  • Article

    Springtime Recipe: Chicken Lettuce Wraps

    We asked the dietitians from our Get Up & Go team to offer up healthy, delicious recipes that fit the spring season. These lettuce wraps are flavorful, easy to make and a lighter alternative as the weather begins to warm up this season.



  • Video

    Children's Health on Good Morning Texas: Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Stormi Pulver White, Psy. D., a pediatric psychologist with the Children's Health Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities joined Dr. Sue Hubbard on WFAA's Good Morning Texas recently to discuss Autism Spectrum Disorder, its signs, symptoms and what you as a parent should know.


  • Article

    Codeine & Your Child

    With cough and cold season underway, you need to be aware that a time-honored, go-to treatment for children’s coughs is no longer recommended. The FDA is investigating the safety of codeine cough syrup for children younger than 18, and the American Academy of Pediatrics now recommends against codeine for children with coughs.


  • Article

    Separating Allergy Facts from Fiction

    If your child has seasonal or year-round environmental allergies, you already know many of the basic facts. You know your child’s symptoms are triggered by allergens like pollen, dander, or mold spores. You’re aware that these symptoms can make outdoor sports and other activities difficult, if not impossible, for your child during certain months. And, you know your doctor can prescribe certain treatments to ease the sneezing, itching, and watery eyes that appear each year.





  • Article

    How Does Living in the Dallas Area Affect My Child’s Seasonal Allergies?

    Every year the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America ranks the worst cities for allergies. In spring 2015, Dallas was the 19th worst. In spring 2016, it fell to 27th — better, but still one of the worst in the nation. Texas is deep in the Pollen Belt — the region of the country that stretches from the southern Midwest to the Southeast. It’s the worst area for allergies in the nation. If your child has seasonal allergies, they have some specific challenges living in the Dallas area. Unlike some other parts of the country, there’s a seasonal allergy for all four seasons:.


  • Article

    Don’t Let Scoliosis Throw Your Kid a Curve

    If you grew up being reminded to stand up straight or pull back your shoulders, you’re not alone. But for three out of every 100 adolescents who are diagnosed with scoliosis, perfect posture [Link to Posture article] might be out of reach without medical intervention.


  • Article

    Ear Infections — Educational Resources

    An ear infection is the number one reason parents bring a child to the doctor. While rare in adults, 75% of kids will develop an ear infection by the time they are three years old. An ear infection most often affects the middle ear and is usually caused by bacteria. Fluid and mucus buildup behind the eardrum causing pressure and, eventually, pain. Ear infections usually follow a respiratory infection such as a cold or a sore throat. If the ear infection is bacterial, the bacteria will spread to the middle ear causing an ear infection. In a viral infection, the bacteria are "driven" to the middle ear by the virus, resulting in a secondary infection.


  • Article

    Fast Facts: Managing asthma in the winter

    Have you ever noticed that it's more difficult to breathe in the wintertime? That's because cold air causes your airways to contract. For kids with asthma, that constriction can make breathing much more difficult — and makes asthma attacks more likely. Meanwhile, other health conditions like the flu and respiratory infections are more common during colder months, and those can make asthma symptoms worse.


  • Article

    Fidget spinners Q & A with Children's Health experts

    Fidget spinners are the most popular gadgets of the moment amongst middle schoolers. But many teachers are finding them very distracting and banning them in the classroom, despite some people believing that they can improve focus in children with ADHD. Patricia Rodriguez, M.D., a pediatrician at Children's Health, and Roshini Kumar, Clinical Therapist, LCP, in the Pediatric Outpatient Psychiatry department at Children's Health answer some questions about the choking hazards of fidget spinners and healthier ways hyperactive children can burn off excess energy.


  • Article

    First Aid and CPR for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Children

    While rare, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) can affect infants, children and teens and can be fatal if cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not administered quickly – usually in a matter of minutes. Structural or functional problems with a child’s heart, arrhythmias or genetic syndromes can increase the risk of SCA. And, while some of these conditions are identified, monitored and treated from birth, certain rhythmic or structural problems don’t produce symptoms and may not be diagnosed unless caught on an unrelated screening or found in a family member. Certain serious injuries and allergic reactions can also lead to SCA.


  • Article

    Food Allergies — Educational Resources

    The Food Allergy Center at Children’s Health℠ Children's Medical Centeris working toward finding a cure and improving the quality of life for children and families dealing with food allergies. If your child has food allergies, refer to the following list of resources that was developed by our pediatric food allergy experts.


  • Article

    Food allergies don’t have to dampen the spirit of the holidays

    With the holidays around the corner, most parents are looking forward to their child’s Thanksgiving feast, school Christmas parties and family meals. But for me and many others whose children have food allergies, it can be a scary and stressful time of year. Most holiday foods contain at least one of the top eight allergens – milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, tree nuts and peanuts. For example, Elliekate, my 3-year-old daughter, has a severe food allergy to eggs, tree nuts, peanuts and sesame. She cannot have the traditional recipes for most all holiday foods including sweet potato casserole, stuffing or pie.


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Chocolate Cake

    We’re sharing recipes for an entire food-allergy-friendly holiday meal. You’ll want to try them all! The following Chocolate Cake is allergy-friendly recipe and is free of peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. It's also gluten and dairy free.


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Herbed Prime Rib Roast

    Recent research shows that 1 in every 13 children in the United States has a food allergy, that’s approximately 2 children in every classroom. The following recipe is free of peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. This week, we’re sharing recipes for an entire food-allergy-friendly holiday meal. You’ll want to try them all!


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Holiday Berry Sauce

    Even if your kids don’t have food allergies, it’s likely that this holiday season you’ll be cooking for one of your kids’ cousins or friends who is allergic to one of the top eight food-allergy triggers (milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat).


  • Article

    Food-Allergy-Friendly Recipe: Sweet Potato Apple Casserole

    We’re sharing directions for Sweet Potato Apple Casserole. In the United States 90% of all food allergic reactions are caused by just eight foods: peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. This week we’re sharing directions for an entire food-allergy-friendly holiday meal. You’ll want to try them all!


  • Article

    Fractured vertebra: More common than you think in young athletes

    Your young athlete works hard to be at the top of their game. It can be difficult to know what aches are normal and what pains need a doctor’s attention. If your child frequently bends or twists their back during sports and they experience frequent lower back pain, it might be time to ask their doctor about spondylolysis.


  • Video

    Easy, healthy recipe: EGGstraordinary Frittatas

    Breakfast is an EGGcelent way to start the day. Why not try something simple yet extraordinarily delicious to get your kids EGGcited. Denon Stacy, M.S., R.D.L.D., a clinical dietitian at Children’s Health℠, whips up a delicious recipe for egg frittatas. Using three different food groups, this recipe is EGGstra healthy and sure to satisfy your kids' hunger.



  • Article

    Hanna’s Story: Expert care when she needed it most

    For Hanna, age 11, and her family, July 2, 2016, started off just like any other Texas summer day. They were out at their friend’s house, the sun was out, and it was hot. The older kids had gone up to the barn to feed the horses while Hanna found refuge from the Texas heat in the shade of a tree. Though it’s not clear exactly how it happened, a John Deere Gator™ utility vehicle slipped out of gear and rolled down the hill towards Hanna, crushing her against the tree. “The next thing we knew, one of the kids came running up to the house yelling, ‘Hanna!’” says Mart, Hanna’s father. “When we got to the tree, Hanna was standing up, but she was as white as a ghost.”


  • Article

    Healthier Triple Mac n Cheese

    Like most, your Thanksgiving meal probably means a feast of many different sides in addition to the turkey and desserts. But there's no reason why you couldn't prepare healthy versions of those sides to help make the meal a bit more nutritious.


  • Article

    Healthy Pumpkin Pie is a Family-Favorite Recipe

    It sounds contradictory, but not all sweets have to be bad for you. Often, what makes sweets unhealthy in the first place is that we eat too much of them. So, when thinking about ways to keep your children healthy through the holidays, consider healthy alternatives to traditional treats, and remember to emphasize portion control at every meal, party and snack-time.


  • Article

    Healthy Resolutions - A Family Affair

    Olivia Munger, is a Registered Dietitian in the Children’s Health Get Up & Go program, gives parents three tips for a healthier new year.




  • Article

    How to Pack Fresh, Fit School Lunches

    Parents, now that the holiday break is over for your little ones, it's time to start thinking about school lunches again. Making, packing and taking lunches from home ensures your kids get a healthy, well-balanced meal at school.


  • Article

    Influenza — Educational Resources

    To help your family stay healthy during flu season, the infectious disease experts from Children’s Health℠ have developed resources about the flu.


  • Article

    In case you MIST it: Nasal flu vaccine gets shelved this season

    If you are like many parents, the nasal mist option made it much easier to ensure your child was vaccinated against the flu. You didn’t have to worry about your child’s fear of needles or the screams of terror and fall-down tantrums leading up to the injection. Plus, the post-vaccination ice cream or cookie treat became more of an option than a promise.


  • Article

    New fruit juice guidelines Q&A with Children’s Health expert

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recently updated their fruit juice guidelines, recommending no fruit juice for children under 1 year. Denon Stacy, Clinical Dietitian, MS, RD, CSP, LD from Clinical Nutrition at Children's Health answered a few questions regarding the new recommendations.


  • Article

    Over the Counter Medicine

    If a medicine doesn't require a prescription, many parents assume it's safe for their child to take. That's not always the case. Children often need smaller doses than adults take, while other medications aren't meant for kids at all. At Children’s, we want all kids to feel better, but we also want them to be safe.


  • Article

    Pertussis can be fatal to your child – everyone should get vaccinated

    Pertussis is a highly contagious illness of the respiratory mucous membrane. It’s marked by a series of short, violent coughs sometimes followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like whoop. A type of bacteria called Bordetella pertussis causes this infectious disease. The bacteria attach to the cilia (tiny, hair-like extensions) that line the upper respiratory system. Bordetella pertussis toxins (poisons) damage the cilia and cause airways to swell.


  • Article

    You can win the picky eater battle

    "We tend to think of young children as picky eaters because by nature they are suspicious of new foods, and at this age they start exerting their independence in the form of saying 'no!'" says Olivia Munger, a Registered Dietitian with the Children's Health℠ Get Up and Go program.


  • Article

    Pink Eye — Educational Resources

    Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, is an inflammation of the thin membrane that covers the inner eyelids and white surface of the eye.


  • Article

    Help Your Family Prevent Cycling Injuries This Spring

    Studies estimate that large numbers of these cyclists experience physical problems: 48 percent in their necks, 42 percent in their knees, 36 percent in the groin and buttocks, 31 percent in their hands, and 30 percent in the back. No matter why they use a bicycle, young people can follow some basic safety principles to avoid common cycling injuries.


  • Article

    Rashes — Educational Resources

    A rash is a patch of red, inflamed skin that may be itchy, painful or swollen. Rashes are common in kids and can be the result of many things, including allergies, infections or irritants. Most rashes are easily treated and clear up quickly. If your child's rash lingers or doesn't respond to medications, call your doctor.


  • Article

    Riding a Bike to School

    For many kids, riding their bike to school is a rite of passage. It means you're one of the big kids, the cool kids. But dangers abound, even for older children, when traveling to school. In 2011 we had 10 patients sustain injuries that required admission to Children's Health℠ after being hit by a car while riding their bike and one of these children died.


  • Article

    Safety Tips for Kids Walking to School

    The danger of walking to school has never been greater than it is now with texting, tweeting and phone calls to distract drivers. During the back-to-school season — in August and September — at Children's Medical Center, the Emergency Department sees an increase in trauma-related pedestrian, bicycle and school bus injuries. Last year, there were 83 patients admitted to Children's after suffering injuries from being hit by a car while walking and six of these children died. Many of these injuries and those like it are preventable by following some simple safety guidelines. "The most common injury we see from children walking to school is a vehicle collision with a human," said Claudia Romo, program manager for Injury Prevention at Children's Health℠. "These injuries can range from scrapes and bruises to multiple fractures, head and brain injuries."


  • Article

    School Bus Safety Tips

    "The big yellow dog," school buses, are supposed to deliver our children safely to school. But even still, during the back-to-school season — in August and September — at Children’s Medical Center, the Emergency Department sees an increase in trauma-related pedestrian, bicycle and even school bus injuries. And many of which are preventable by following some simple safety guidelines.


  • Article

    Screening for Heart Disease in Children

    In another recent post, you learned how childhood obesity can be a significant risk factor for heart disease, especially when it’s accompanied by factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or prediabetes, physical inactivity and an unhealthy diet. The first line of defense against childhood obesity includes incorporating more physical exercise and nutritious foods into a child’s lifestyle.


  • Article

    Seizures — Educational Resources

    Improving seizure care for children in North Texas is a top priority for the team at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Children’s Health℠ Children’s Medical Center Dallas. With this goal in mind, our pediatric epilepsy specialists have put together a list of resources to assist families and other health care providers with the management of seizures.


  • Article

    Should I Worry About My Child's BMI? Body Mass Index Explained

    BMI measurements can cause a lot of frustration and confusion for parents. Kids are growing and need to eat well to gain weight during childhood. Like adults, kids come in all shapes and sizes, but a person’s weight in childhood is a strong predictor of their weight in adulthood, so it is important to monitor.



  • Article

    Spine injury: Children in sports at risk for slipped disks

    Young athletes face their share of bumps and scrapes, but first aid kits aren’t the solution to every injury. If your child has recurring lower back pain or spondylolysis, they may be at risk for spondylolisthesis, a slipped disk in the spine.


  • Article

    Spring Cleaning Tips for Including the Kids

    The weather’s getting warmer, birds are chirping, flowers are blooming – and you’re likely holding a mile-long spring cleaning list. Spring cleaning holds many benefits. If you or anyone in your family suffers from allergies, ridding the house of lingering dust, mold and pollen can bring some relief. Spring cleaning reduces the bacteria you live with, resulting in a healthier environment. Plus, after a season of family gatherings, indoor activities, holiday gifts and school projects, you’re probably craving a little fresher air and open space inside your home.


  • Article

    Strep Throat — Educational Resources

    Strep throat is an infection caused by highly contagious streptococcal bacteria. It can spread through coughing, sneezing or sharing food or drinks. At Children's, we see lots of kids with strep throat, especially during cold and flu season. If your think your child may have strep throat, see your doctor. Although strep itself isn't dangerous, it can lead to complications that may be.


  • Article

    Strokes: Kids can have them too!

    It’s not just the elderly who have strokes. In children, strokes are often due to blood clotting problems, congenital heart disease, infection or other long term conditions like Sickle Cell Disease. A pediatric neurologist at Children’s Health explains the signs and symptoms of stroke in children


  • Article

    Sun Safety Tips for Kids

    It's warming up, and outdoor activities are in full swing. With temperatures increasing fast and skin cancer on the rise in young adults, it's important to protect your kids from the hot Texas sun. These sun safety tips will help you do just that.


  • Article

    Survival guide: Your young athlete and two-a-days practices

    These extra training sessions help to accelerate physical conditioning, skill development and team cohesion. However, athletes can experience increased amounts of physical and psychological stress during these multi-session practices. Troy Smurawa, M.D., is the Director of Pediatric Sports Medicine at the Children’s Health℠ Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. He shares a few tips to help your athlete survive two-a-days and extended practices while gearing up for a great season by getting the most out of each workout.


  • Article

    Surviving the Holidays: How to Support Your Kid's Healthier Nutrition Habits During the Holidays

    On average, people gain 1-3 pounds over the six-weeks of holidays (Thanksgiving to New Year’s). You may think that this is insignificant, but most people are unable to lose the pounds gained during the holidays. Hence, over the years, added holiday pounds have become detrimental. In addition, as we gain weight our body composition changes, increasing our ratio of fat mass to muscular mass since the weight gain is usually fat. The increase in body fat can cause many metabolic changes.


  • Article

    Talking with your child about suicide

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults, according to the CDC. Most suicide attempts in children and adolescents occur in the midst of depression or other mood disorders. Nearly one in five high schoolers have seriously considered suicide within the past 12 months, and about 8% have made an attempt. Many do not want to die, but they feel ambivalent (i.e., have mixed feelings) about life and simply want to end emotional or physical pain. Suicide is 100% preventable and there are effective treatments to help. Dr. Nicholas J. Westers, a clinical psychologist at Children’s Health, offers the following advice for parents.



  • Article

    Three Quick Tips to Help Boost Your Child's Body Image

    In an interview with the Mirror in April 2014, a British teen with body dysmorphic disorder described spending up to 10 hours a day taking hundreds of photos of himself at a time in pursuit of the perfect selfie. He admitted that he eventually attempted suicide in response to his dissatisfaction with his appearance in selfies. Although taking selfies did not cause this young man’s body dysmorphic disorder, one way in which his disorder manifested itself was his preoccupation with taking an "ideal" selfie.


  • Article

    Tick-Tock: Time to adjust your child’s sleep schedule.

    As your family’s extended break from school comes to an end, one important item that may be missing from your back-to-school checklist – or may be started too late – is transitioning your student’s sleep from a break-time schedule back to a routine school-night schedule.


  • Article

    Tips to help motivate your child to exercise

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, children should get one hour of exercise each day. "Exercise is at the forefront of physical health," says Performance Manager Josh Adams, M.S., C.S.C.S., Children's Health Andrews Institute Sports Performance powered by EXOS. "Exercise helps children strengthen growing muscles and bones and is part of a healthy lifestyle, combined with quality nutrition and adequate sleep."




  • Article

    Vacation Checklist - Healthy Holiday Travel Tips

    Whether you’re taking a day trip to see the holiday lights and pretty poinsettias in a nearby town or traveling across the country to share feasts and festivities with relatives this holiday season, you’ll need essential supplies to keep your children happy and healthy along the way.


  • Article

    Vaccines protect children from crippling or fatal diseases

    Vaccines protect children from getting sick from many crippling or deadly illnesses. Thanks to decades of immunization, diseases like measles and polio are mostly a thing of the past in the U.S. "Despite what you may have heard, vaccines are quite safe for children," says Jeffrey Kahn, M.D., Director of Infectious Disease at Children’s. "In fact, the risks to your child from catching the diseases vaccines prevent far outweigh any threat posed by the vaccines themselves."


  • Article

    Valentine's Day FYI: Is Chocolate Really Good For Your Heart?

    Chocolate is a by-product of the cocoa bean or cacao bean. In the 15th and 16th centuries, people in Mexico made a foamy drink with the cacao bean, and spiced it with chili, allspice, honey or vanilla. The beverage was expensive to make and enjoyed mostly by the elite. It wasn’t until the 18th century that the first form of solid chocolate was developed in Italy. Today more than 50 percent of the cocoa harvested annually comes from West Africa. In the United States market alone, chocolate sales average over $19 billion a year. Consumers demand for the organic version of chocolate is also on the rise.


  • Article

    Veggie Chips Are Nutritious, Right?

    How healthy are veggie chips? Laura Walker, a registered dietitian with the Children's Health Get Up and Go program, shares the details.


  • Article

    What Is Turf Toe Anyway: Common Sports Injuries Explained

    As the new football season kicks off across the nation, you’ll probably be hearing a lot about "turf toe." I know what you’re thinking, and no, turf toe isn’t an excess of green hair covering the feet of athletes. The term turf toe actually refers to a common injury among athletes of all different sports. While turf toe is most common in football players, it also affects players of other sports such as basketball, wrestling and gymnastics. Essentially, turf toe is a sprain of the tendons, usually around the big toe, that hold the joint in place. These tendons allow the big toe joint to function as a hinge that receives a lot of stress from the continued jumping and running motions that are common in sports.


  • Article

    What to do when your child has a fever

    When your child has a fever, it is a sign that their immune system is fighting off an infection. "The vast majority of infectious diseases that are associated with a high fever are caused by a virus, and are usually accompanied by coughing, congestion, vomiting or diarrhea," says LeAnn Kridelbaugh, M.D., President of Children's HealthSM Pediatric Group. "Fever can also coincide with an ear infection or strep throat as well as less common infections like pneumonia."


  • Article

    When Does the Shape of a Newborn's Head Require Medical Attention?

    The shape of a newborn’s head is often a topic of discussion when a new member of the family arrives. Sometimes the head is a little pointed; sometimes it’s a little flat in a spot or two. This is usually nothing more than the normal effects of being born, according to Christopher Derderian, M.D., a member of the Plastic and Craniofacial Surgery team at Children’s Health Children’s Medical Center Dallas.


  • Article

    Winter blues? Or something more serious

    Each winter you might notice a dip in your child’s mood and a change in his or her behavior, and then witness them return to being themselves again once springtime hits. You might even experience these seasonal changes yourself.




  • Article

    Zika virus concerns and prevention

    Although first discovered in 1947 in the Zika forest of Uganda, Africa; the Zika virus has recently become a concern in other parts of the world; including South and Central America, the U.S., and locally here in Texas. Most of the population is not significantly impacted by Zika infections; however, others can incur serious ramifications.

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