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Articles, videos and more to keep your family healthy.


  • Which heart screenings are necessary for athletes?

    Article

    Which heart screenings are necessary for athletes?

    Every parent wants to keep his or her child safe. For many parents of athletes, it's not just sprains and strains that cause anxiety; it's the possibility of an undiscovered heart condition.


  • Trust your gut: 4 signs your child should see a GI specialist

    Article

    Trust your gut: 4 signs your child should see a GI specialist

    Maintaining good digestive health is important at every stage of life, but it is especially important for kids. Getting proper nutrition and eating a healthy diet are critical factors in ensuring your child grows and develops properly, according to Meghana Sathe, M.D., Pediatric Gastroenterologist at Children’s Health and Associate Professor at UT Southwestern. Good digestive health helps set your child up for success by enabling him or her to gain weight, grow taller and reach physical and mental developmental milestones.


  • Video game addiction: When is gaming more than just a hobby?

    Article

    Video game addiction: When is gaming more than just a hobby?

    It's not a surprise for most parents that video games can affect their child's behavior and emotions. However, parents may be surprised to learn that the World Health Organization (WHO) now classifies 'gaming disorder' as a mental health condition.


  • Hep A, B, C's

    Article

    Hep A, B, C's

    Many parents hear the term hepatitis and either worry or don't understand what it means for their child. Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver that can be caused by different diseases including a virus – hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are the most common viruses causing hepatitis.


  • How to have a safer pool party

    Article

    How to have a safer pool party

    Pool parties are a great way for kids to cool off, celebrate and get out some extra energy during the warmer months. However, being in the water comes with some risk. Drowning is the fifth leading cause of unintentional injury death in the U.S. – and data from Children’s Health shows that 38.8% of children who came to the ER for a drowning event were swimming in a new environment, such as a pool party.



  • 6 Signs your child may have an eating disorder

    Article

    6 Signs your child may have an eating disorder

    Eating disorders are characterized by unhealthy approaches to eating, weight and exercise. But they are more than a refusal to eat healthy; eating disorders are complex psychiatric disorders. If your child has an eating disorder, he or she also might have problems with self-image, anxiety and even depression. As many as 30 million people in the United States have an eating disorder. The causes of eating disorders continue to be researched. Biological, sociological, psychological and cultural factors can all play a part in the development of an eating disorder.


  • 8 ways to practice mindful eating

    Article

    8 ways to practice mindful eating

    Families today are busier than ever. With so much on children's plates between school, sports and other activities, taking time to focus on an actual plate can be daunting. However, teaching children to be mindful of what they eat is an essential part of establishing healthy eating habits.


  • A guide to sun protective clothing for kids

    Article

    A guide to sun protective clothing for kids

    Research shows that just five serious sunburns can greatly increase a child's risk of developing skin cancer later in life. During the hot summer months, it's a good time to take stock of how parents can best protect their children's skin.


  • Protect your family from insect-borne illnesses [Infographic]

    Infographic

    Protect your family from insect-borne illnesses [Infographic]

    According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of disease cases from mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled from 2004 to 2016. Additionally, nine new germs spread by mosquitos and ticks have been discovered since 2004.

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