Health & Wellness Library

Articles, videos and more to keep your family healthy.


  • Talking with your child about suicide

    Article

    Talking with your child about suicide

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults, according to the CDC. Most suicide attempts in children and adolescents occur in the midst of depression or other mood disorders. Nearly one in five high schoolers have seriously considered suicide within the past 12 months, and about 8% have made an attempt. Many do not want to die, but they feel ambivalent (i.e., have mixed feelings) about life and simply want to end emotional or physical pain. Suicide is 100% preventable and there are effective treatments to help. Dr. Nicholas J. Westers, a clinical psychologist at Children’s Health, offers the following advice for parents.



  • How to support the parents of a child with cancer

    Article

    How to support the parents of a child with cancer

    When a child in your community is diagnosed with cancer, it's natural to want to help, but you might not always know how to lend a hand. "It's so hard because every parent copes differently," says Mary Van Meter, certified child life specialist at Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Health. "Many parents say it is hard to hear 'I'm so sorry.' Rather, it’s important to focus on the positive statements of, 'We are in this with you. Whatever you need, we're here.'"


  • How to talk to your child about weight

    Article

    How to talk to your child about weight

    Though it is an increasingly common condition, obesity is not a superficial issue. Carrying extra weight can lead to increased risk for diabetes, heart disease and even cancer. With childhood obesity rates rising, these health risks are affecting children at a much younger age.


  • Does my child have IBS?

    Article

    Does my child have IBS?

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a GI disorder that changes the function of the GI tract, from muscle movement to what signals are sent from the intestines to the brain. These microscopic changes result in the symptoms that categorize IBS, including abdominal pain and problems with constipation and diarrhea.


  • Common football injuries and how to prevent them

    Article

    Common football injuries and how to prevent them

    Football season is a favorite time of year for many – especially across Texas. As excitement builds for Friday night lights, it's important that players, parents and coaches work together to avoid common football injuries and stay healthy throughout the season.


  • 4 health effects of vaping

    Article

    4 health effects of vaping

    The number of teens who vape has risen significantly over the past decade. In 2011, approximately 1.5% of high school students reported e-cigarette use in the past month. In 2018, 20.9% of high school seniors reported vaping within the past month – and more than 37% reported using e-cigarettes within the past 12 months.


  • Bullying at school: Signs your child is being bullied

    Article

    Bullying at school: Signs your child is being bullied

    According to stopbullying.gov, bullying is defined as unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-age children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time.


  • When should your child see a doctor for a bump on the head?

    Article

    When should your child see a doctor for a bump on the head?

    From a countertop at just the right height to a fall on the playground, there are all kinds of ways children can take a bump to the head. Goose eggs, bruises and complaints of a headache can leave you wondering if that bump on the head is worthy of a call to the doctor.


  • How to prevent kidney stones in kids

    Article

    How to prevent kidney stones in kids

    If your child develops one kidney stone, does that put him or her at risk of developing kidney stones throughout their lifetime? Not necessarily. While not entirely preventable, there are steps parents can take to help reduce their child’s risk of developing kidney stones.


  • Preventing back-to-school sickness

    Article

    Preventing back-to-school sickness

    A new school year brings new classes, new teachers and happy reunions with friends after the summer break. But if you've ever noticed that the school year also brings increased sniffles and coughs, you're not alone.

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