How an overlooked Eating Disorder can surface at the Holidays
Dec 19, 2016, 12:00:00 AM CST Jun 8, 2018, 1:09:19 PM CDT

How an overlooked Eating Disorder can surface at the Holidays

Because the holidays offer more opportunity for family time, this can be when parents start to notice unhealthy eating habits in their children.

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Young boy sitting at the table with a fork in hand Young boy sitting at the table with a fork in hand

Because the holidays offer more opportunity for family time, this can be when parents start to notice unhealthy eating habits in their children.

Dr. Sonia Schwalen, a psychologist in our Center for Pediatric Eating Disorders at Children’s Health℠ Plano, explains why. “When the school year is up and running, with work schedules and sports schedules and all the busy things that families do, it can be difficult to notice that your child is not eating as much as you thought they were,” she says. “At the holidays, parents might notice their child isn’t eating at every meal, eats less or finds ways to avoid family meal time, all of which could be a cause for concern.”

Both at holiday time and the rest of the year, Dr. Schwalen offers the following recommendations for parents:

  1. Check their social situations
    Children who struggle with higher anxiety or depression, or even an eating disorder, may also struggle with social situations and might prefer to withdraw or isolate, and spend more time in their room. Parents should monitor the amount of time that their kids are spending alone, especially when everyone else is at home, as isolation could be a warning sign that kids are not doing well.
  2. Monitor food consumption
    “Frequently we see families who come in to us that gave the responsibility to their child to pack their lunches in the morning, or they might not be checking up on them to see if they are actually eating lunch at school,” Dr. Schwalen says. During the school year, parents should communicate with the child’s teacher or school if there is a concern that their child may not be eating enough.
  3. Carve out time for family
    In addition to fostering family communication, family time gives parents a daily opportunity to check in with their children and see how they’re doing. Parents should also be mindful of the behaviors they model that could promote negative body image, such as discussion of diets and weight loss, which many obsess over at the holidays.

Overall, Dr. Schwalen says, parents should take advantage of the holidays and the new year to reset good habits and be more aware of their children’s attitudes and food behaviors.

Learn More

If parents are concerned that their child may be exhibiting unhealthy eating habits, review the 6 common eating disorder warning signs and find more information at Center for Pediatric Eating Disorders

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anxiety, behavior, depression, diet, cognitive, eating disorder, eating habits, emotion, mental health, physician advice, psychology

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