Hematology (Blood Disorders)

Share:

Contact

Having a child with a blood disorder can mean a challenging time for the both the patient and the patient’s family. The hematology programs at the Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders brings one of the nation’s top programs for children with blood and bone marrow disorders to your child’s care.

Bleeding Disorders (Hemophilia)

Our Bleeding Disorders Program is one of only 130 centers in the United States, and five in Texas, with a comprehensive hemophilia treatment program. From genetic counseling and early diagnosis—including care of the mother during pregnancy—through ongoing education programs, the team works closely with family, schools, and other medical and dental care providers to prevent bleeding episodes.

Sickle Cell Program

The Sickle Cell Program at the Gill Center has been recognized for groundbreaking research and comprehensive care. Our work has led the way in defining the use of penicillin to prevent infections in infants, and moved the management of fevers in low-risk patients out of the hospital and into the home. The Dallas Newborn Cohort has followed children since 1983 and provided invaluable insight on medical problems they face from childhood to adulthood. Each year, our staff cares for more than 700 children with the various forms of sickle cell disease, often with the very treatments our researchers developed.

Why Children’s Health?

With 24 pediatric hematologists and oncologists on staff, all of whom are also faculty members at UT Southwestern Medical Center, we have one of the largest dedicated pediatric hematology medical staffs in the country. Our group of experienced hematologists, hematology nurses and nurse practitioners is unrivaled in North Texas. 

Our inpatient nurses complete an extensive orientation and must pass an Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON) biotherapy provider course and test.

On the outpatient side, nurses come with experience in caring for the Gill Center patient population. The nurses are specialized by patient population, including hematology, sickle cell, hemophilia and bleeding disorders, and stem cell transplant.

Our highly trained and professional nursing staff is one of the reasons Children’s Health℠ has been designated as a Magnet Hospital by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Being a Magnet Hospital puts us in the top 7% of the world’s hospitals and is a reflection of the excellence of our nursing staff.

The Gill Center treats more than 300 patients a year. The four broad areas of scientific and clinical interest include Bleeding Disorders and Thrombosis, Bone Marrow Failure, Sickle Cell Disease and General Hematology.

Care Team Profiles

The Bone Marrow Failure Program at the Gill Center treats a group of rare and very complex disorders. Relying on a panel of subspecialists including endocrinologists, gastroenterologists, orthopedists, cardiologist and others, we have an unsurpassed breadth and depth of expertise to bring to your child’s care.

The Sickle Cell Program at the Gill Center has been recognized for groundbreaking research and comprehensive care. Our work has lead the way in defining the use of penicillin to prevent infections in infants, and moved the management of fevers in low-risk patients out of the hospital and back home. The Dallas Newborn Cohort has followed children since 1983 and provided invaluable insight on medical problems they face from childhood to adulthood. Each year, our staff cares for more than 700 children with the various forms of sickle cell disease, often with the very treatments our researchers developed.

The General Hematology Program manages all patients not handled by the other three Programs. Over 30 years the Program has built a foundation of excellence in clinical care and research.

Much of the activity of the doctors is helping physicians in communities throughout Texas with practical advice about how best to manage their patients. They can also assure the doctor, the patient and their parents that no major blood disorder is present. Yet if needed, one of the largest dedicated pediatric hematology medical staffs in the country, composed of experienced hematologists, hematology nurses and nurse practitioners, is available.