Health & Wellness Library

Articles, videos and more to keep your family healthy.




  • Preventing back-to-school sickness

    Article

    Preventing back-to-school sickness

    A new school year brings new classes, new teachers and happy reunions with friends after the summer break. But if you've ever noticed that the school year also brings increased sniffles and coughs, you're not alone.


  • Back-to-school nutrition tips

    Article

    Back-to-school nutrition tips

    A new school year is the perfect time to get back in a healthy routine. Kara Gann, Clinical Dietitian at Children's Health, shares some simple ways to make sure students are fueling properly for the school day.


  • Back-to-School anxiety: Ways to help your child cope

    Article

    Back-to-School anxiety: Ways to help your child cope

    A new school year can trigger feelings of anxiety in children of all ages. There are new classes, teachers, friends and pressures, all mixed with the physical changes that come with growing up. As a parent, you are the first responder in your child's life when they are feeling anxious, but it can be difficult to know what's a normal amount of nerves and how you can help.


  • Tips for transitioning to a new school

    Article

    Tips for transitioning to a new school

    A new school year means a change in the life of your child. Some changes may be more significant for children than for others – especially if they are moving to a new school.


  • School bus safety

    Article

    School bus safety

    School buses are made to deliver children safely to school. But even still, during the back-to-school season the Children's Health Emergency Department sees an increase in trauma-related pedestrian, bicycle and even school bus injuries, many of which are preventable by following some simple safety guidelines.


  • Managing chronic diseases at school

    Article

    Managing chronic diseases at school

    Children with chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes or epilepsy need extra attention at school to stay safe and healthy. With the right treatment plan and support, children with these conditions can flourish at school without putting their health at risk.


  • Navigating accommodations and modifications in public schools

    Article

    Navigating accommodations and modifications in public schools

    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, children with disabilities, including learning, intellectual or physical disabilities, are required to receive extra support in public schools. By law, your child should have a 504 plan or an Individualized Education Program (IEP) that outlines what accommodations and modifications they need in school.



  • Easy and healthy school lunch ideas

    Article

    Easy and healthy school lunch ideas

    Packing a school lunch is a great way to help your child make healthy choices, but it can be easy to get stuck in a rut. This year, think outside the box and beyond the sandwich.


  • 4 Back to school tips that may surprise you

    Article

    4 Back to school tips that may surprise you

    The start of a new school year can be exciting, but it can also make your child feel anxious, especially if last year was a rough one, or if he or she is entering a new school. While some back-to-school tips are widely known (like get plenty of sleep and eat a healthy breakfast), there are other ways to prepare. Nicholas J. Westers, Psy.D., a clinical psychologist at Children's Health and Assistant Professor at UT Southwestern, shares four ways to help your child start the year off right.


  • Survival guide: Your young athlete and two-a-day practices

    Article

    Survival guide: Your young athlete and two-a-day practices

    These extra training sessions help to accelerate physical conditioning, skill development and team cohesion. However, athletes can experience increased amounts of physical and psychological stress during these multi-session practices. Troy Smurawa, M.D., is the Director of Pediatric Sports Medicine at the Andrews Institute for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. He shares tips to help your athlete survive two-a-days and get the most out of each workout.



  • Help your child stay motivated in school

    Article

    Help your child stay motivated in school

    It's not news that not all children enjoy school. If your child dreads going to school each day or simply seems uninterested in working hard in school, their motivation for learning may be an issue. You can help your child get excited about school at any age by getting involved and providing the right sort of praise. To help your child stay motivated academically, below are a few key strategies.


  • Fractured vertebra: More common than you think in young athletes

    Article

    Fractured vertebra: More common than you think in young athletes

    Your young athlete works hard to be at the top of their game. It can be difficult to know what aches are normal and what pains need a doctor's attention. If your child frequently bends or twists their back during sports and they experience frequent lower back pain, it might be time to ask their doctor about spondylolysis.


  • The importance of breakfast for kids

    Article

    The importance of breakfast for kids

    For many students and their families, mornings are a race against the clock to get out the door and to school on time – and all too often, kids skip breakfast in the rush. However, research suggests that this habit can lead to decreased focus and learning and have a negative impact on school performance. Kids should eat breakfast every day. Learn what type of breakfast foods can boost your child's brain power.


  • Turn your child's screen time into an opportunity for learning

    Article

    Turn your child's screen time into an opportunity for learning

    You know too much screen time is not a good thing for your child. But what about when that screen time is used to build skills in math, science and reading? There are a wide variety of educational apps that can keep your child entertained while learning at the same time.


  • 8 facts about food allergies in children

    Article

    8 facts about food allergies in children

    Allergies are one of the most common health conditions affecting children (age 0-17). Food allergies currently affect 4 - 6% of our youth in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the number of children diagnosed with food allergies is steadily increasing – up 18% in the past decade.


  • Safety tips for kids walking to school

    Article

    Safety tips for kids walking to school

    Walking to school can have multiple benefits for you and your kids such as spending time outdoors and starting the day with physical activity. However, with drivers distracted by texting, tweeting and phone calls, the danger of walking to school has increased over the years. While it's important that drivers are alert, kids should be too.


  • Car seat safety tips for your child's growth and age levels

    Article

    Car seat safety tips for your child's growth and age levels

    Every 33 seconds, a child in the U.S. is involved in a car crash. Regrettably, over a third of the children who died in those crashes were not in a car seat restraint, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).


  • Pertussis can be fatal to your child – everyone should get vaccinated

    Article

    Pertussis can be fatal to your child – everyone should get vaccinated

    Pertussis is a highly contagious illness of the respiratory mucous membrane. It’s marked by a series of short, violent coughs sometimes followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like whoop. A type of bacteria called Bordetella pertussis causes this infectious disease. The bacteria attach to the cilia (tiny, hair-like extensions) that line the upper respiratory system. Bordetella pertussis toxins (poisons) damage the cilia and cause airways to swell.


  • 5 tips for healthy school lunches

    Article

    5 tips for healthy school lunches

    When asked what a healthy lunch looks like, dietitians at Children's Health℠ remind parents that the best lunch is one that your child will eat. But how do you encourage your child to choose items that will power them through the second half of the day, rather than slow them down?


  • What are signs of bullying parents can look for?

    Video

    What are signs of bullying parents can look for?

    If your child is being bullied at school, he or she might be hesitant to share that information with you. In this video, Celia Heppner, Psy.D., clinical psychologist at Children's Health, shares signs to look for if you suspect your child is being bullied or teased.

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