Pediatric Bladder Stones

Pediatric Bladder Stones

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Summary

Bladder stones form when the minerals in your child’s urine make crystals and stick together.

Expanded overview

Bladder stones range in size from sand to rocks.  Bladder stones form when the minerals in your child’s urine make crystals and stick together.  This can happen when there is frequent urine infection, incomplete urine emptying, or prior bladder surgeries.  If the crystals and sand stay in the bladder for a while, they can grow to be the size of rocks and even a grapefruit.

Causes

The most common causes and risk factors for bladder stones are:

Incomplete bladder emptying from medications, urethral blockage, or nerve damage to the bladder (called neurogenic bladder from spina bifida or spinal cord injury)

Symptoms

Sometimes, bladder stones are small and your child may have no symptoms. However, bladder stones can roll around in the bladder and can cause symptoms that may include:

Treatment

Usually bladder stones need surgical removal under anesthesia.  A pediatric urologist will use tiny scopes, lasers and baskets to break and remove the stones.

Resources

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