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Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness and a skin rash. A healthy immune system protects your child from infection by attacking invaders such as viruses or other pathogens. In children with dermatomyositis, the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissue, causing inflammation. Dermatomyositis is part of a larger group of muscle disorders known as inflammatory myopathies.

Pediatric Fibromyalgia

A heightened sensitivity to pain receptors in the brain is believed to be the underlying cause of fibromyalgia. Learn more about this condition.

Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) causes inflammation of the joints when the immune system attacks its own cells and tissues.

Pediatric Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN)

Pediatric polyarteritis nodosa causes inflammation of the blood vessels that can lead to organ damage. The condition is rare in children. Learn more.

Pediatric Osteoarthritis

Pediatric osteoarthritis causes pain and stiffness in a child’s joints that make it difficult to move. Learn the causes.

Pediatric Osteoporosis

Pediatric osteoporosis is a rare condition that causes bone loss and increases your child’s risk of fractures. Learn more.

Scleroderma

Scleroderma is a group of autoimmune diseases that cause the skin and connective tissues (tissues that support the skin and internal organs) to get thick and hard.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, pain and swelling. A healthy immune system protects your child from infection by attacking invaders such as viruses or other pathogens. In children with lupus, the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own cells and tissue, causing inflammation. Lupus can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain and other organs. It is more common in adolescent girls than boys

Vasculitis

Vasculitis is an inflammation of the blood vessels (arteries, veins or capillaries). It occurs when the patient’s immune system mistakenly attacks a blood vessel. The inflammation can cause weakening or narrowing of the vessels, which can cut off blood flow to internal organs. Although the cause is unknown, vasculitis often follows an infection.

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