Pediatric Facial Nerve Palsy After Tumor Resection

Pediatric Facial Nerve Palsy After Tumor Resection

Pediatric Facial Nerve Palsy After Tumor Resection

After a tumor has been removed, facial nerve palsy can sometimes develop, which causes paralysis in one side of the child’s face.

What is Pediatric Facial Nerve Palsy After Tumor Resection?

When a child has a facial tumor, surgery to remove all or most of the tumor may be the recommended course of treatment. This procedure is known as tumor resection. In some cases, a child who has undergone a tumor resection for a facial tumor may develop facial nerve palsy.

Facial nerve palsy – also known as facial paralysis – is a loss of facial movement due to nerve damage. Children with facial nerve palsy have one side of the face that appears to droop or becomes weak.

What are the signs and symptoms of Pediatric Facial Nerve Palsy After Tumor Resection?

  • Cannot blink eye on the affected side
  • Decreased tearing on that side
  • Difficulty eating or drinking
  • Drooling
  • Drooping of the mouth on the affected side
  • Facial paralysis on one side
  • Pain in or behind the ear
  • Slurred speech