Conditions We Treat in the Epilepsy Center

Conditions We Treat in the Epilepsy Center

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Pediatric Angelman Syndrome

Pediatric Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a genetic condition characterized by problems learning and thinking, delays in developing speech/language, difficulty controlling and coordinating muscle movements, seizures, and a happy, easily excited disposition.

Cortical Dysplasia

Cortical Dysplasia is a very common cause of epilepsy and occurs when part of the brain forms abnormally.

Pediatric Doose Syndrome

Pediatric Doose Syndrome, also called Myoclonic-Astatic Epilepsy (MAE), is an epileptic condition in children that has no known cause. The seizures, which often begin between the ages of 1 and 5, can be frequent and involve the abrupt loss of muscle control, causing the child to fall to the ground, often resulting in injury. Boys are twice as likely as girls to have the syndrome. The seizures originate from all parts of the brain, which makes controlling them with medication difficult.

Pediatric Dravet Syndrome

Pediatric Dravet Syndrome, also known as Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI), is a genetic epileptic condition in children. It is associated with other medical problems including cardiac problems.

Epilepsy

Pediatric epilepsy causes a child to have repeated seizures, which can vary in type, duration and frequency over time. Learn more about what to expect with this condition.

Infantile Spasm (West's Syndrome)

Infantile Spasms, also known as West's Syndrome, happen in infants normally after 3 months of age and consist of a series of short jerks.

Landau-Kleffner Syndrome

Landau-Kleffner Syndrome, is a rare disorder with no known cause. The condition is characterized by the gradual or sudden loss of the ability to understand and use spoken language, and the onset of seizures, which usually occur at night. The condition usually appears in children between 3 and 7 years of age.

Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome causes behavior changes and seizures in children. Learn more about this rare form of epilepsy.

Neurofibromatosis (NF)

Neurofibromatosis causes tumors to grow on nerve tissue throughout the body. Learn how these tumors can affect hearing, vision, the heart and more.

Neuronal Migration Defects

Neuronal Migration Defects occur while the infant is still growing in the womb and affects the developing brain.

Sturge-Weber Syndrome

In children, Sturge-Weber syndrome causes a port-wine stain on the face, along with possible developmental delays and eye problems. Learn more.

Pediatric Rasmussen’s Syndrome

The Epilepsy Center at Children’s Health was the first such program in the country to be certified by the Joint Commission, the nation’s preeminent standard-setting accrediting and certifying regulatory body in healthcare. We are also a Level 4 Epilepsy Center, providing the highest level of treatment for children with epilepsy. That means we have experience identifying Rasmussen’s Syndrome and in researching the latest advances in treatment for the condition.

Pediatric Rett Syndrome

The Epilepsy Center at Children’s Health was the first such program in the country to be certified by the Joint Commission, the nation’s preeminent standard-setting accrediting and certifying regulatory body in healthcare. We are also a Level 4 Epilepsy Center, providing the highest level of treatment for children with epilepsy. That means we have experience identifying Rett Syndrome, and in researching the latest advances in treatment for the condition.

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