Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)

Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)

Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited condition that causes colon and rectal cancers.

What is Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)?

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary (passed down in families) syndrome that causes cancers of the colon and rectum. People with FAP can begin to develop benign (noncancerous) polyps as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will turn malignant (cancerous) over time.

What are the signs and symptoms of Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)?

  • Blood or mucus in the stools, or bleeding from the rectum
  • Diarrhea or constipation that lasts longer than six weeks
  • Pain in the abdomen or rectum
  • Unintentional, unexplained weight loss

What are the causes of Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)?

Passed down in families, FAP is a congenital (present at birth) condition caused by a gene mutation.

Pediatric Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) Doctors and Providers