Web Content Viewer

Researcher spotlight:Ted Laetsch, M.D.

Share:

Laetsch Theodor

Theodore W. Laetsch, M.D. is a faculty member in the Department of Pediatrics at UT Southwestern and leads the Experimental Therapeutics Program (ETP) in the Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Health℠. Dr. Laetsch received his B.S. in Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering from the University of Arizona and his M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Laetsch completed his residency at the University of Colorado/Children’s Hospital Colorado, where he served as chief resident. He completed his fellowship training and an instructorship at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), where he conducted translational laboratory research focused on mechanisms to restore apoptotic signaling in neuroblastoma in the laboratory of Dr. Michael Hogarty.

Dr. Laetsch  joined the faculty at UT Southwestern in 2013. He conducts both clinical and laboratory-based research testing potential novel therapeutics in high-risk pediatric solid tumors with a goal of “bridging the gap” between laboratory research and early phase clinical trials. In the laboratory, he has focused on signaling pathway inhibitors and novel drug delivery mechanisms in sarcomas, and the use of beta-lapachone in ATRTs. As the leader of the ETP program, Dr. Laetsch serves as the PI of several phase 1 and phase 2 studies of new agents for children with relapsed or refractory cancer and serves as the institutional TACL PI. Dr. Laetsch has a strong interest in the use of tumor molecular profiling to guide therapy. In addition to these research activities, Dr. Laetsch treats children with cancer in the clinic at Children’s Medical Center Dallas.

Read more about Dr. Laetsch and his involvement in the Novartis-sponsored ELIANA study of a groundbreaking cancer therapy within The New England Journal of Medicine, “Tisagenlecleucel in Children and Young Adults with B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia” N Engl J Med 2018;378:439-48.
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1709866

Topics:
Previous Title of Previous Blog Post Goes Here Next Title of Next Blog Post Goes Here

Connect With Us

Subscribe

Stay connected to Children’s Health!

Please enter a valid email.